Originally published at Ongoing History of Protest Music

Danceland is a Toronto-based jam band, which includes husband and wife vocalists and songwriters Joe and Jale Ferland. They recently released their debut album, “Pink Lem.”

While the album is the group’s debut, Joe Ferland is a veteran musician who was part of the 1990s New York City music scene. He played in an array of rock and pop-punk groups, even earning a few record deals. Over time, the grind of the music business burnt him out, and he took a 10-year hiatus.

The genesis of many of the tunes on the album was pandemic isolation and the death of Joe’s mom. They weave autobiographical elements into strong storytelling narratives.

One of the songs called “Not Without A Fight” is a pointed social critique in support of Black Lives Matter, survivors of domestic abuse, homeless children, indigenous people, and the LGBTQ+ community.

“This tune is a reaction to the constant injustice suffered by innocent people just trying to live their lives,” Joe explains. “It was inspired by a culmination of events including the killings of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd and the horrific stories surrounding indigenous children in residential schools here in Canada.”

A lyric video with complimentary visuals was developed for “Not Without A Fight.”

Watch or listen to “Not Without A Fight” by Danceland:

CJ Baker

CJ Baker

CJ Baker is a lifelong music fan and published writer. He recently started a website chronicling the historical developments of protest music: ongoinghistoryofprotestsongs.com, and can be found on Twitter @tunesofprotest