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I love the smell of capitalism burning in the morning

Ray Schultz, the former police chief of the embattled Albuquerque Police Department that the DOJ is investigating, has been accused of improperly accepting perks and consulting work from Taser International in return for assisting the company to be awarded a lucrative $1.95 million no-bid contract to supply the department with body cameras. His accuser is the New Mexico State Auditor Tim Keller who recently completed an audit of the department. Keller says Schultz started working as a consultant for Taser International when he was still employed and being paid as the police chief.

Amy Connolly of the UPI reports

The state auditor’s office found Schultz and others in the police department received a number of perks from Taser as they helped secure the contract, including tickets to a party at a San Diego nightclub, an all-expenses paid trip to Scottsdale, Ariz., for training and speaking engagements in Texas.

“The contracts between the city and Taser circumvented the competitive process, or, in former APD Chief Raymond Shultz’s own words, the process was ‘greased.’ The taxpayers are not well served when the process is gamed by our leaders,” Keller said.

[http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2015/05/01/Report-Former-Albuquerque-police-chief-violated-ethics-laws/3621430471008/],

Schultz denies wrongdoing.

I love the smell of capitalism burning in the morning.

 

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Frederick Leatherman

Frederick Leatherman

I am a former law professor and felony criminal defense lawyer who practiced in state and federal courts for 30 years specializing in death penalty cases, forensics, and drug cases.

I taught criminal law, criminal procedure, law and forensics, and trial advocacy for three years after retiring from my law practice.

I also co-founded Innocence Project Northwest (IPNW) at the University of Washington School of Law in Seattle and recruited 40 lawyers who agreed to work pro bono, assisted by law students, representing 17 innocent men and women wrongfully convicted of sexually abusing their children in the notorious Wenatchee Sex Ring witch-hunt prosecutions during the mid 90s. All 17 were freed from imprisonment.

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