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Mitt Romney Finding Little Support For 2016 Run

Mitt Romney, 2006.jpg

Mitt Romney

Former Massachusetts Governor and presidential candidate Mitt Romney announced to supporters that he was exploring a run for president of the United States in the upcoming 2016 election. While it is not unprecedented for someone who lost the presidential race as the party’s nominee to gain the nomination again it is rare. The view is, understandably, that the person who lost in the general election is a proven loser and it makes more sense to give someone new a try in order to win.

Romney’s interest in a 2016 presidential run may have been good news to his die hard supporters, but the prospect of Romney as the party’s nominee in 2016 has been poorly received by conservatives. Both conservative publications such as the Wall Street Journal and National Review as well as well known conservative Republican politicians such as Sarah Palin and Scott Walker weighed in saying Romney’s time had past.

It is possible Mitt Romney misread Republican’s intense disappointment in President Obama’s performance and longing for what could have been if Obama had been defeated in 2012 as a sign that they really liked Romney – but that appears not to be the case. Republican antagonism for Obama exists independently of any connection to the failed candidacy of Mitt Romney in 2012.

The critical reception marked the latest stage of post-2012conservative sentiment toward Romney. In the immediate aftermath of his loss, he was the feckless, wooden candidate who blew a prime opportunity to snatch the White House from an unpopular Democratic incumbent. Next came the “maybe he wasn’t so bad, after all” phase, when Romney seemed vindicated by President Barack Obama’s recurring second-term missteps. That lasted much through most of 2014.

Now it’s reality-check time. The faded memories of Romney’s 2012 shortcomings are snapping back into focus as he drifts, with apparent seriousness, toward yet another run for the White House. The harshly negative reaction presents an early test of Romney’s resolve, against what’s certain to be a more formidable field than he encountered last time.

Unlike in 2012 the field for the GOP establishment’s support is already crowded. Mitt Romney joins both Jeb Bush and Chris Christie in seeking the support of mainstream corporate donors. But given the fundraising goals being laid out such as Jeb Bush supporter’s plan to raise $100 million in three months it looks like three serious establishment candidates might be a crowd especially for a candidate he already had his chance like Romney.

So with a soured conservative base and considerable competition for Big Business’ blessing Mitt Romney might be a candidate without a constituency. In that case it might be time for Mitt to finally retire no matter how much he clearly hates retirement.

Photo by Hazhk under Creative Commons license.

CommunityThe Bullpen

Mitt Romney Finding Little Support For 2016 Run

Mitt Romney, 2006.jpg

Mitt Romney

Former Massachusetts Governor and presidential candidate Mitt Romney announced to supporters that he was exploring a run for president of the United States in the upcoming 2016 election. While it is not unprecedented for someone who lost the presidential race as the party’s nominee to gain the nomination again it is rare. The view is, understandably, that the person who lost in the general election is a proven loser and it makes more sense to give someone new a try in order to win.

Romney’s interest in a 2016 presidential run may have been good news to his die hard supporters, but the prospect of Romney as the party’s nominee in 2016 has been poorly received by conservatives. Both conservative publications such as the Wall Street Journal and National Review as well as well known conservative Republican politicians such as Sarah Palin and Scott Walker weighed in saying Romney’s time had past.

It is possible Mitt Romney misread Republican’s intense disappointment in President Obama’s performance and longing for what could have been if Obama had been defeated in 2012 as a sign that they really liked Romney – but that  appears not to be the case. Republican antagonism for Obama exists independently of any connection to the failed candidacy of Mitt Romney in 2012.

The critical reception marked the latest stage of post-2012conservative sentiment toward Romney. In the immediate aftermath of his loss, he was the feckless, wooden candidate who blew a prime opportunity to snatch the White House from an unpopular Democratic incumbent. Next came the “maybe he wasn’t so bad, after all” phase, when Romney seemed vindicated by President Barack Obama’s recurring second-term missteps. That lasted much through most of 2014.

Now it’s reality-check time. The faded memories of Romney’s 2012 shortcomings are snapping back into focus as he drifts, with apparent seriousness, toward yet another run for the White House. The harshly negative reaction presents an early test of Romney’s resolve, against what’s certain to be a more formidable field than he encountered last time.

Unlike in 2012 the field for the GOP establishment’s support is already crowded. Mitt Romney joins both Jeb Bush and Chris Christie in seeking the support of mainstream corporate donors. But given the fundraising goals being laid out such as Jeb Bush supporter’s plan to raise $100 million in three months it looks like three serious establishment candidates might be a crowd especially for a candidate he already had his chance like Romney.

So with a soured conservative base and considerable competition for Big Business’ blessing Mitt Romney might be a candidate without a constituency. In that case it might be time for Mitt to finally retire no matter how much he clearly hates retirement.

Photo by Hazhk under Creative Commons license.

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Dan Wright

Dan Wright

Daniel Wright is a longtime blogger and currently writes for Shadowproof. He lives in New Jersey, by choice.