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Pull Up a Chair: Art in Science, Science in Art

Artists and scientists see things differently than the ordinary mortal. Here are a couple videos that show what I mean. Those of you who are scientists and artists already know this.

The first is on the beauty of a flower by Richard Feynman:

champion of scientific culturegraphic novel herocrusader for integrityholder of the key to scienceadviser of future generationsbongo playerno ordinary genius. In this fantastic animated adaptation of an excerpt from Christopher Sykes’s celebrated 1981 BBC documentary about Feynman, The Pleasure of Finding Things Out — which gave us the great physicist’s timeless words on beauty, honors, and curiosity and his fascinating explanation of where trees actually come from — Fraser Davidson captures in stunning motion graphics Feynman’s short, sublime soliloquy on why knowledge enriches life rather than detracting from its mystery, the best thing since that animated adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot.”


Animator Fraser Davidson

The second is on turbulence as depicted by Vincent van Gogh:

Even in his darkest time, Van Gogh was able to capture — eerily accurately — one of nature’s most complex and confusing concepts … 100 years before scientists began to scratch the surface.


The unexpected math behind Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” – Natalya St. Clair, animation by Avi Ofer.

It’s always enriching to see things in a new way, don’t you think?

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Pull Up a Chair: Art in Science, Science in Art

Artists and scientists see things differently than the ordinary mortal. Here are a couple videos that show what I mean. Those of you who are scientists and artists already know this.

The first is on the beauty of a flower by Richard Feynman:

champion of scientific culturegraphic novel herocrusader for integrityholder of the key to scienceadviser of future generationsbongo playerno ordinary genius. In this fantastic animated adaptation of an excerpt from Christopher Sykes’s celebrated 1981 BBC documentary about Feynman, The Pleasure of Finding Things Out — which gave us the great physicist’s timeless words on beauty, honors, and curiosity and his fascinating explanation of where trees actually come from — Fraser Davidson captures in stunning motion graphics Feynman’s short, sublime soliloquy on why knowledge enriches life rather than detracting from its mystery, the best thing since that animated adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot.”


Animator Fraser Davidson

The second is on turbulence as depicted by Vincent van Gogh:

Even in his darkest time, Van Gogh was able to capture — eerily accurately — one of nature’s most complex and confusing concepts … 100 years before scientists began to scratch the surface.


The unexpected math behind Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” – Natalya St. Clair, animation by Avi Ofer.

It’s always enriching to see things in a new way, don’t you think?

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Elliott

Elliott