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Video: Republican Climate Deniers in 2014 Election


Midterms 2014: Candidates dodge & deny threat of climate change

This video is a mixture of painfully-awkward, hilarious, and infuriating at the reality of the political system in which we are supposedly represented. Courtesy of Lee Fang, for Republic Report and Huffington Post.

And there’s more out there, if you can bear it. I promise that the end of this blog will not be as pessimistic as what follows.

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner has said “I’m not qualified to debate the science over climate change,” when asked about climate change, as if he was unable to have his staff ask climate scientists for him, or as if he hasn’t heard anything about the issue over the last 25 years. This is the top politician in the House of Representatives talking, whose party holds the House majority.

Worse than Rep. Boehner is New Hampshire Senate candidate Scott Brown, a former Massachusetts Senator who now denies climate change after previously claiming he recognized the crisis.

In a 2013 debate, Scott Brown said “I absolutely believe that climate change is real, and I believe there’s a combination between man-made and natural.” This was misleading, since it’s the unnatural climate change that matters. But at least it wasn’t outright denial like this year, when Scott Brown said, “no,” after being asked if climate change is “scientifically proven” at a debate hosted at Exeter. Ack…did he think nobody would notice this clear self-contradiction?

The same problem exists among Governors who are failing to show leadership on climate change in their states.

Like Congressman Boehner, Florida Governor Rick Scott plead ignorance with the “I’m not a scientist” line. This poor excuse gave Florida scientists the opportunity to ask to meet with Gov. Scott, and they did just that. Watch scientists brief Rick Scott on climate change to his face, met by Scott’s weird stare and hollow acknowledgement of the assistance.

Meanwhile, NJ Governor Chris Christie has gone backwards on acknowledging climate science. In 2011 Christie recognized that “climate change is real and it’s impacting our state,” and urged, “When you have over 90 percent of the world’s scientists who have studied this stating that climate change is occurring and that humans play a contributing role, it’s time to defer to the experts.” Christie repeated his convictions just a year ago, affirming in a debate, “I think climate change is real and I think human activity plays a role.”

Now, in the 2014 election year, Governor Christie won’t discuss climate. The closest he has come is his recent dismissal of climate change’s role in making hurricane Sandy worse–something climate scientists have actually affirmed (with careful fine print, as is usually the case with science). Note Christie’s close ties to the billionaire Koch brothers: the governor has met with David Koch in private, entertained guests at the Kochs’ secretive political summits without telling his own constituents, and caved to their political campaigning against climate change programs.

For the crazy flank, enter Maine Governor Paul LePage. Watch Gov. LePage claim that climate change would be good for Maine. Such gibberish not only ignores the specific threats climate change poses to Maine, but ignores peer-reviewed projections that the costs of inaction on climate change outweigh the costs of addressing the problem $8 trillion by 2100.

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Video: Republican Climate Deniers in 2014 Election

Crossposted from Greenpeace’s blog, the EnvironmentaLIST: VIDEO: Quotes from Climate Denial Candidates


Midterms 2014: Candidates dodge & deny threat of climate change

This video is a mixture of painfully-awkward, hilarious, and infuriating at the reality of the political system in which we are supposedly represented. Courtesy of Lee Fang, for Republic Report and Huffington Post.

And there’s more out there, if you can bear it. I promise that the end of this blog will not be as pessimistic as what follows.

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner has said “I’m not qualified to debate the science over climate change,” when asked about climate change, as if he was unable to have his staff ask climate scientists for him, or as if he hasn’t heard anything about the issue over the last 25 years. This is the top politician in the House of Representatives talking, whose party holds the House majority.

Worse than Rep. Boehner is New Hampshire Senate candidate Scott Brown, a former Massachusetts Senator who now denies climate change after previously claiming he recognized the crisis.

In a 2013 debate, Scott Brown said “I absolutely believe that climate change is real, and I believe there’s a combination between man-made and natural.” This was misleading, since it’s the unnatural climate change that matters. But at least it wasn’t outright denial like this year, when Scott Brown said, “no,” after being asked if climate change is “scientifically proven” at a debate hosted at Exeter. Ack…did he think nobody would notice this clear self-contradiction?

The same problem exists among Governors who are failing to show leadership on climate change in their states.

Like Congressman Boehner, Florida Governor Rick Scott plead ignorance with the “I’m not a scientist” line. This poor excuse gave Florida scientists the opportunity to ask to meet with Gov. Scott, and they did just that. Watch scientists brief Rick Scott on climate change to his face, met by Scott’s weird stare and hollow acknowledgement of the assistance.

Meanwhile, NJ Governor Chris Christie has gone backwards on acknowledging climate science. In 2011 Christie recognized that “climate change is real and it’s impacting our state,” and urged, “When you have over 90 percent of the world’s scientists who have studied this stating that climate change is occurring and that humans play a contributing role, it’s time to defer to the experts.” Christie repeated his convictions just a year ago, affirming in a debate, “I think climate change is real and I think human activity plays a role.”

Now, in the 2014 election year, Governor Christie won’t discuss climate. The closest he has come is his recent dismissal of climate change’s role in making hurricane Sandy worse–something climate scientists have actually affirmed (with careful fine print, as is usually the case with science). Note Christie’s close ties to the billionaire Koch brothers: the governor has met with David Koch in private, entertained guests at the Kochs’ secretive political summits without telling his own constituents, and caved to their political campaigning against climate change programs.

For the crazy flank, enter Maine Governor Paul LePage. Watch Gov. LePage claim that climate change would be good for Maine. Such gibberish not only ignores the specific threats climate change poses to Maine, but ignores peer-reviewed projections that the costs of inaction on climate change outweigh the costs of addressing the problem $8 trillion by 2100. (more…)

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