CommunityFDL Main BlogThe Bullpen

Marc Andreessen Calls Snowden Traitor, Doesn’t Want Democracy

{!hitembed ID=”hitembed_1″ width=”530″ height=”298″ align=”none” !}

Though Silicon Valley and the tech industry is generally known as being more liberal than other economic sectors it is worth noting that it too has its share of plutocrat reactionaries. Though venture capitalist Tom Perkins became the face of the faction with his comparison of Occupy Wall Street to Nazis, a more relevant example would be Mark Andreessen who not only stands out as opposing measures to rein in wealth equality but has trumpeted his support for domestic surveillance programs.

Andreessen’s claim to fame was starting the early internet browser company Netscape which he essentially privatized without payment from a government sponsored project at a the University of Illinois. Netscape would be ultimately be crushed by Microsoft but Andreessen would stay in the tech world and become a founder and partner at one of the Silicon Valley’s most powerful venture capital firms – Andreessen Horowitz.

In recent interviews Andreessen has laid out a very hard line both on promoting the myth of meritocracy in Silicon Valley and the Snowden revelations concerning Silicon Valley’s involved with the NSA on spying on Americans and others. Andreessen said Snowden is a textbook traitor and that direct democracy is a terrible idea because “The last thing you want to do is put the mob in charge.”

Q: It’s the “China for a day” thing. If you could just be an autocracy for one day, fix all the problems, and then go back to democracy.

Andreesen: This is a long-running view that business has held. And the reason is, if you’re a businessperson, especially a CEO, you actually run a dictatorship. But businesses and governments are different, in my belief. They actually have very little to do with each other. And so I’m actually completely on the other side of that argument. When it comes to government, I am pro-gridlock.

Q: How so?

Andreesen: I think the American system is incredibly well developed. I think the founding fathers were geniuses. I think the founding fathers had lived under effective ­government, and it was called King George, and they did not like it. I mean, they knew what an autocratic government was like. And so they implemented a representative democracy, with the representation layer as a buffer against autocratic change and against mob rule. The other thing I don’t like is direct democracy. This proposition system we have in California is craziness, just lunacy. The last thing you want to do is put the mob in charge.

Andreessen also went on to say the Silicon Valley is a meritocracy with the caveat that you have to part of a network to access it. Having to know people to get opportunities is not really a meritocracy in the way most people view the term. Meritocracy for most people means gaining opportunities based on merit. Which we know is not happening in Silicon Valley.

For some reason the barons of Silicon Valley previously had a lot more good will from the public than their elite counterparts in Manhattan, Hollywood, and DC. Perhaps it is time to realize that plutocrats generally have more in common with each other than the 99%.

CommunityThe Bullpen

Marc Andreessen Calls Snowden Traitor, Doesn’t Want Democracy

{!hitembed ID=”hitembed_1″ width=”500″ height=”281″ align=”none” !}

Though Silicon Valley and the tech industry is generally known as being more liberal than other economic sectors it is worth noting that it too has its share of plutocrat reactionaries. Though venture capitalist Tom Perkins became the face of the faction with his comparison of Occupy Wall Street to Nazis, a more relevant example would be Mark Andreessen who not only stands out as opposing measures to rein in wealth inequality but has trumpeted his support for domestic surveillance programs.

Andreessen’s claim to fame was starting the early internet browser company Netscape which he essentially privatized without payment from a government sponsored project at a the University of Illinois. Netscape would be ultimately be crushed by Microsoft but Andreessen would stay in the tech world and become a founder and partner at one of the Silicon Valley’s most powerful venture capital firms – Andreessen Horowitz.

In recent interviews Andreessen has laid out a very hard line both on promoting the myth of meritocracy in Silicon Valley and the Snowden revelations concerning Silicon Valley’s involved with the NSA on spying on Americans and others. Andreessen said Snowden is a textbook traitor and that direct democracy is a terrible idea because “The last thing you want to do is put the mob in charge.”

Q: It’s the “China for a day” thing. If you could just be an autocracy for one day, fix all the problems, and then go back to democracy.

Andreesen: This is a long-running view that business has held. And the reason is, if you’re a businessperson, especially a CEO, you actually run a dictatorship. But businesses and governments are different, in my belief. They actually have very little to do with each other. And so I’m actually completely on the other side of that argument. When it comes to government, I am pro-gridlock.

Q: How so?

Andreesen: I think the American system is incredibly well developed. I think the founding fathers were geniuses. I think the founding fathers had lived under effective ­government, and it was called King George, and they did not like it. I mean, they knew what an autocratic government was like. And so they implemented a representative democracy, with the representation layer as a buffer against autocratic change and against mob rule. The other thing I don’t like is direct democracy. This proposition system we have in California is craziness, just lunacy. The last thing you want to do is put the mob in charge.

Andreessen also went on to say the Silicon Valley is a meritocracy with the caveat that you have to part of a network to access it. Having to know people to get opportunities is not really a meritocracy in the way most people view the term. Meritocracy for most people means gaining opportunities based on merit. Which we know is not happening in Silicon Valley.

For some reason the barons of Silicon Valley previously had a lot more good will from the public than their elite counterparts in Manhattan, Hollywood, and DC. Perhaps it is time to realize that plutocrats generally have more in common with each other than the 99%.

Previous post

Republicans Welcome Ebola (Satire)

Next post

Sen. Alexander (R-TN) Opposes Feds Interfering in State Marijuana Laws

Dan Wright

Dan Wright

Daniel Wright is a longtime blogger and currently writes for Shadowproof. He lives in New Jersey, by choice.