CommunityFDL Main Blog

FDL Movie Night – Forward 13: Waking Up The American Dream

The filmmakers have made the entire film available on Hulu

Forward 13: Waking Up the American Dream starts off as the very personal story of how filmmaker Patrick Lovell and his family bought their first home and then lost it as a result of predatory lending practices.  It’s ironic, because Lovell himself was  producer for the nationally syndicated show HomeTeam during this time, which helped families purchase and renovate new homes who otherwise could not afford it.

His own experience caused Lovell to connect with others who had similar experiences.  He  soon joined up with philanthropist and Executive Producer Adam Bronfman and the two began to tell a story  that contextualizes Lovell’s experience within that of the entire mortgage meltdown.  They contrast the losses suffered by middle class American families during the crisis with TARP and the extraordinary bonuses that bankers were extracting after the failure of Lehmans, afraid to keep their money in their own corrupt system any more.

The film soon expands to explore the interconnectedness of problems such as our enormous investment in and dependence on fossil fuels, war for oil, climate change, plutocratic government, money in politics, the death of the American dream and how it all came together in Occupy Wall Street.  And, subsequently, how the government used its resources to crush the movement.

Ultimately the strength of Forward 13: Waking Up the American Dream lies in the tale of the awakening consciousness of the filmmakers, who try to sound the warning bell about the multiple crises we face and the dangers of a calcified, unresponsive political system.  The film is ultimately hopeful in its message that misfortune can bring people together and spur them to action, regardless of the odds against them.

ArtsCommunity

FDL Movie Night – Forward 13: Waking Up The American Dream

The filmmakers have made the entire film available on Hulu

Forward 13: Waking Up the American Dream starts off as the very personal story of how filmmaker Patrick Lovell and his family bought their first home and then lost it as a result of predatory lending practices.  It’s ironic, because Lovell himself was  producer for the nationally syndicated show HomeTeam during this time, which helped families purchase and renovate new homes who otherwise could not afford it.

His own experience caused Lovell to connect with others who had similar experiences.  He  soon joined up with philanthropist and Executive Producer Adam Bronfman and the two began to tell a story  that contextualizes Lovell’s experience within that of the entire mortgage meltdown.  They contrast the losses suffered by middle class American families during the crisis with TARP and the extraordinary bonuses that bankers were extracting after the failure of Lehmans, afraid to keep their money in their own corrupt system any more.

The film soon expands to explore the interconnectedness of problems such as our enormous investment in and dependence on fossil fuels, war for oil, climate change, plutocratic government, money in politics, the death of the American dream and how it all came together in Occupy Wall Street.  And, subsequently, how the government used its resources to crush the movement.

Ultimately the strength of Forward 13: Waking Up the American Dream lies in the tale of the awakening consciousness of the filmmakers, who try to sound the warning bell about the multiple crises we face and the dangers of a calcified, unresponsive political system.  The film is ultimately in its message that misfortune can bring people together and spur them to action, regardless of the odds against them.

Previous post

The Six Main Ways Marijuana Can Be Legalized

Next post

Fukushima Update

Jane Hamsher

Jane Hamsher

Jane is the founder of Firedoglake.com. Her work has also appeared on the Huffington Post, Alternet and The American Prospect. She’s the author of the best selling book Killer Instinct and has produced such films Natural Born Killers and Permanent Midnight. She lives in Washington DC.
Subscribe in a reader