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Mining the Earth: 30 Sep 2014

MINING THE EARTH:

*Everywhere.  Last ditch efforts by some utilities around the globe to halt renewables include taxes on “solar energy-equipped houses and offices”, vigorous lobbying to stop governments providing incentives to “green energy”, much heftier “daily connection” fees rather than billing for units of energy used, etc.  Will alternative energy users be subsidizing traditional utilities in the future?

*AZ.  (See also Mexico).  Authorities are testing the water in the San Pedro River (which flows north from Mexico into AZ) to make sure the on-going disaster at Grupo Mexico’s Buenavista mine in Sonora, Mexico has not resulted in contamination of the San Pedro.

*IA.  Two towns in IA—Bloomfield and Algona—dependent on coal-fired plants for electricity, could cut their costs [and charges to customers] “substantially . . . if they invest in deep efficiencies and, to a lesser extent, in renewable sources of generation.”  The Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities participated in the study.

*NV.  Canadian-based Veris Gold will pay a $182,000 penalty to the US Environmental Protection Agency “for failing to correctly report . . . the release of millions of pounds of toxic chemicals—including arsenic and cyanide [and lead, mercury, nickel, zinc, copper, and cobalt]—into the air and ground.”  That occurred at the Jerritt Canyon mine, which last year received 49 citations and 12 safety orders.

More after the jump

CommunityMyFDL Front Page

Mining the Earth: 30 Sep 2014

MINING THE EARTH:

*Everywhere. Last ditch efforts by some utilities around the globe to halt renewables include taxes on “solar energy-equipped houses and offices”, vigorous lobbying to stop governments providing incentives to “green energy”, much heftier “daily connection” fees rather than billing for units of energy used, etc. Will alternative energy users be subsidizing traditional utilities in the future?

*AZ. (See also Mexico). Authorities are testing the water in the San Pedro River (which flows north from Mexico into AZ) to make sure the on-going disaster at Grupo Mexico’s Buenavista mine in Sonora, Mexico has not resulted in contamination of the San Pedro.

*IA. Two towns in IA—Bloomfield and Algona—dependent on coal-fired plants for electricity, could cut their costs [and charges to customers] “substantially . . . if they invest in deep efficiencies and, to a lesser extent, in renewable sources of generation.” The Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities participated in the study.

*NV. Canadian-based Veris Gold will pay a $182,000 penalty to the US Environmental Protection Agency “for failing to correctly report . . . the release of millions of pounds of toxic chemicals—including arsenic and cyanide [and lead, mercury, nickel, zinc, copper, and cobalt]—into the air and ground.” That occurred at the Jerritt Canyon mine, which last year received 49 citations and 12 safety orders.

*WV. 84 years ago this month, 5,000 coal miners confronted some 3,000 company-backed men in “the largest armed labor conflict in the nation’s history”. After five days of intense struggle, then-President Harding sent in federal troops. For decades the Blair Mountain Battlefield was on the National Register of Historic Places—until 2009, when the government removed it. The Sierra Club and local historical associations sued, lost the first round, appealed and have won.

*WV. (more…)

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