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Comcast Thinks Everyone Supports Their Merger With Time Warner, Even If They Don’t

{!hitembed ID=”hitembed_1″ width=”100″ height=”200″ align=”none” !}

As the Comcast-FCC merger makes it way through the regulatory process numerous customers from both companies have noted the already terrible service that is being provided. Both Comcast and Time Warner have virtual monopolies in their own markets and rank worst among customer service. The outcry has been intense with few – outside the company’s payroll – really offering an argument as to why this merger is a good idea for consumers.

But that’s the real world. In Comcast’s world even the members of the public who wrote letters to the FCC opposing the merger really like the merger, even if they do not know it. This is the position of Comcast Executive VP David Cohen who wrote a blog post that accompanied Comcast’s formal 300 pages plus response to critics submission to the FCC.

Comcast today submitted a 324-page response to critics of its purchase of Time Warner Cable, telling the Federal Communications Commission that there is no reason for people to be concerned about the merger. In an accompanying blog post, Comcast Executive VP David Cohen claimed that “virtually all” people who submitted comments to the FCC support the merger whether they know it or not.

“Virtually all commenters recognize and concede—either explicitly or through their silence—that the transaction will deliver substantial consumer welfare and public interest benefits to residential and business customers and in the advertising marketplace,” Cohen wrote.

Interesting interpretation of the chorus of customers and consumers saying no to the merger. The customer is always right because the customer  – consciously or unconsciously – supports the company’s interests?

Comcast’s decision to claim that no one really objects to their merger is an interesting communication strategy and seems to mirror rather well the strategy they use against customers trying to disconnect the service as demonstrated in the “call from hell.” Customers can keep telling Comcast no but Comcast won’t accept no for an answer.

CommunityThe Bullpen

Comcast Thinks Everyone Supports Their Merger With Time Warner, Even If They Don’t

{!hitembed ID=”hitembed_1″ width=”100″ height=”200″ align=”none” !}

As the Comcast-FCC merger makes its way through the regulatory process numerous customers from both companies have noted the already terrible service that is being provided. Both Comcast and Time Warner have virtual monopolies in their own markets and rank worst among customer service. The outcry has been intense with few – outside the company’s payroll – really offering an argument as to why this merger is a good idea for consumers.

But that’s the real world. In Comcast’s world even the members of the public who wrote letters to the FCC opposing the merger really like the merger, even if they do not know it. This is the position of Comcast Executive VP David Cohen who wrote a blog post that accompanied Comcast’s formal 300 pages plus response to critics submission to the FCC.

Comcast today submitted a 324-page response to critics of its purchase of Time Warner Cable, telling the Federal Communications Commission that there is no reason for people to be concerned about the merger. In an accompanying blog post, Comcast Executive VP David Cohen claimed that “virtually all” people who submitted comments to the FCC support the merger whether they know it or not.

“Virtually all commenters recognize and concede—either explicitly or through their silence—that the transaction will deliver substantial consumer welfare and public interest benefits to residential and business customers and in the advertising marketplace,” Cohen wrote.

Interesting interpretation of the chorus of customers and consumers saying no to the merger. The customer is always right because the customer  – consciously or unconsciously – supports the company’s interests?

Comcast’s decision to claim that no one really objects to their merger is an interesting communication strategy and seems to mirror rather well the strategy they use against customers trying to disconnect the service as demonstrated in the “call from hell.” Customers can keep telling Comcast no but Comcast won’t accept no for an answer.

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Dan Wright

Dan Wright

Daniel Wright is a longtime blogger and currently writes for Shadowproof. He lives in New Jersey, by choice.