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Sunday Food: Pickles

Basic pickles in jars.

Since we’ve talked about the various relishes for sandwich making, it seems only natural that we conclude with a mention of the many added tangy pickles that make a sandwich more interesting yet.  There are so many varieties, I doubt any of us like them all, particularly all at once, but without the pickles many of us would find our munchies a bit dull.

I was happy to find a review of every kind I know of, all in one publication here, and encourage you to add your own if you think of any others.  For my taste, sweet dill is the perfection of a ham sandwich, and sour goes best with burgers. Pickle relish makes a hot dog more bearable, and no, I’m not a fan of hotdogs:

Dill: Dill is the most popular variety of cucumber pickle. Herb dill or dill oil is added to impart a distinctive and refreshing flavor. There are many types of dill pickles, including:

  • Genuine Dill – These pickles are made by the slow “processed” method. Dill weed is added to the tanks during the last stage of fermentation or to the jar after fermentation. These pickles usually have a higher lactic acid flavor than other varieties.
  • Kosher Dill – True “Kosher” pickles are those that have been manufactured and certified in accordance with Jewish dietary laws, and made with dill and garlic added to the brine.  The flavor is very popular, more robust than regular dill pickles, so much so, that the name has stuck and kosher dills are the ultimate accompaniment to an overstuffed deli sandwich.
  • Overnight Dill – Cukes are placed fresh into brine (which may include a slight amount of vinegar) for a very short time — one to two days. The entire process takes place under refrigeration, and they stay refrigerated when stored and shipped. The bright green pickles taste like fresh cucumbers accented with dill flavor. They are the kind of pickle you usually find at a deli.
  • Other types of dills include Polish and German style.

Sour/Halfsour: Fresh cucumbers are first placed into a seasoned brine which doesn’t include vinegar. The containers are then refrigerated, and remain refrigerated when stored and shipped. The longer the cucumbers remain in the brine, the more sour they become. Half-sour pickles are extra crispy and keep their fresh cucumber color.

Sweet: Sweet pickles are packed in a sweet mixture of vinegar, sugar and spices. Here are some variations:

CommunityMyFDL Front Page

Sunday Food: Pickles

 

Basic pickles in jars.

(Picture courtesy of christine at flickr.com.)

Since we’ve talked about the various relishes for sandwich making, it seems only natural that we conclude with a mention of the many added tangy pickles that make a sandwich more interesting yet.  There are so many varieties, I doubt any of us like them all, particularly all at once, but without the pickles many of us would find our munchies a bit dull.

I was happy to find a review of every kind I know of, all in one publication here, and encourage you to add your own if you think of any others.  For my taste, sweet dill is the perfection of a ham sandwich, and sour goes best with burgers.  Pickle relish makes a hot dog more bearable, and no, I’m not a fan of hotdogs: (more…)

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Ruth Calvo

Ruth Calvo

I've blogged at The Seminal for about two years, was at cabdrollery for around three. I live in N.TX., worked for Sen.Yarborough of TX after graduation from Wellesley, went on to receive award in playwriting, served on MD Arts Council after award, then managed a few campaigns in MD and served as assistant to a member of the MD House for several years, have worked in legal offices and written for magazines, now am retired but addicted to politics, and join gladly in promoting liberals and liberal policies.