Four Sylvan Sounds

(Picture courtesy of  Corey’s Worrd at flickr.com.)

An integral exhibit in Freer Gallery consists of paintings of rather symbolic nature that seek to evoke the sounds of landscapes in Japan.

Museum founder Charles Lang Freer’s taste for Japanese art grew out of his affection for American tonalist paintings. This intimate exhibition illuminates this connection by juxtaposing landscapes by American artist Thomas Dewing (1851–1938) with Japanese works that Freer acquired in the late 1890s, just after his first tour of Asia. Freer’s idealized notions of “old Japan” paralleled the nostalgic, pastoral aestheticism of Dewing’s atmospheric landscapes. Dewing often acted as Freer’s buying agent at the New York branch of Yamanaka and Company, helping his patron select Japanese prints, hanging scrolls, and screens that both reflected and affected his own artistic production. On view are such Edo-period works as Moon over a Moor alongside Dewing’s paintings, including the exhibition’s namesake, The Four Sylvan Sounds.

Four sounds appear to emanate from the scenes in the artist’s mind.

(picture courtesy of wikipedia commons.)

Freer Gallery

Ruth Calvo

Ruth Calvo

I've blogged at The Seminal for about two years, was at cabdrollery for around three. I live in N.TX., worked for Sen.Yarborough of TX after graduation from Wellesley, went on to receive award in playwriting, served on MD Arts Council after award, then managed a few campaigns in MD and served as assistant to a member of the MD House for several years, have worked in legal offices and written for magazines, now am retired but addicted to politics, and join gladly in promoting liberals and liberal policies.

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