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Albert Woodfox of the Angola 3 Speaks to the Experts About 42 Years of Solitary Confinement

The essay featured below, Albert Woodfox Speaks to the Experts, from the Why Am I Not Surprised? blog is reprinted in full with permission of the author. 

Changeseeker with Albert Woodfox

Albert Woodfox Speaks to the Experts

This past weekend, I visited Albert Woodfox for the umpteenth time in the last five years. All but one of the visits have been at the David Wade Correctional Center in Homer, Louisiana, five hours from where I live.  At the beginning, it was a grueling trip because I wasn’t used to it and I have to go up on Saturday and come back the following day for a total of ten hours behind the wheel in one weekend. Sometimes it rains and once, it poured all the way up and all the way back.

I know I could take someone else along, but visiting somebody that’s been in solitary confinement for what has now been forty-two years is emotionally draining and I don’t want to have to be nicer than I really am for two solid days when I’ve been visiting people in prison since 1971 and every visit eats my lunch.

So I load up on coffee and listen to music or audio books and, over time, I’ve gotten used to the trip. But I’ll never get used to the visits and all the fol-de-rol they put us through just because they can.

Originally, the “rules” allowed us to have two 4-hour visits in a weekend because I live so far away. Though Albert was shackled when he left his cell, the shackles were removed when he got to the visiting room and our visits were conducted sitting at a table where we could eat vending machine food and drink sodas or water. And on holidays, I could purchase a cake at the front door for us to share. The “rules” allowed us to hug at the beginning and at the end of each visit and, on one occasion, the “rules” even allowed us to have a bunch of photos taken, one of which can be seen above.

The most interesting thing about prisons, however, is that the “rules” change all the time, especially for individuals who ostensibly deserve extra punishment for whatever reason. I’m not talking about a prisoner who breaks a rule and goes through a due process that is the same for everyone. I’m talking about a prisoner — like Albert Woodfox — who has been continually tormented for more than forty years because he was one of three men who organized a Black Panther Party chapter in Angola Penitentiary back in the early 1970’s and has now become an international icon of resistance to oppression. Oh, yes. And let’s not forget all the legal suits he’s won and the legal precedents he has set during all those years.

Anyway, the “rules” keep changing for our visits. First, the visits went from four hours to three hours and then they went down to two hours each. So instead of driving ten hours to get eight hours of visiting time, I now drive ten hours to get two 2-hour visits. But it gets worse. [cont’d.]

CommunityMy FDL

Albert Woodfox Speaks About 42 Years of Solitary Confinement

The essay featured below, Albert Woodfox Speaks to the Experts, from the Why Am I Not Surprised? blog is reprinted in full with permission of the author. 

Now 42 years since Albert was first put in solitary, Amnesty International has renewed its call for Albert’s immediate release (view Amnesty’s recent statement and essay). If you have not yet done so, please sign the Amnesty petition today.

Changeseeker with Albert Woodfox

Albert Woodfox Speaks to the Experts

This past weekend, I visited Albert Woodfox for the umpteenth time in the last five years. All but one of the visits have been at the David Wade Correctional Center in Homer, Louisiana, five hours from where I live.  At the beginning, it was a grueling trip because I wasn’t used to it and I have to go up on Saturday and come back the following day for a total of ten hours behind the wheel in one weekend. Sometimes it rains and once, it poured all the way up and all the way back.

I know I could take someone else along, but visiting somebody that’s been in solitary confinement for what has now been forty-two years is emotionally draining and I don’t want to have to be nicer than I really am for two solid days when I’ve been visiting people in prison since 1971 and every visit eats my lunch.

So I load up on coffee and listen to music or audio books and, over time, I’ve gotten used to the trip. But I’ll never get used to the visits and all the fol-de-rol they put us through just because they can.

Originally, the “rules” allowed us to have two 4-hour visits in a weekend because I live so far away. Though Albert was shackled when he left his cell, the shackles were removed when he got to the visiting room and our visits were conducted sitting at a table where we could eat vending machine food and drink sodas or water. And on holidays, I could purchase a cake at the front door for us to share. The “rules” allowed us to hug at the beginning and at the end of each visit and, on one occasion, the “rules” even allowed us to have a bunch of photos taken, one of which can be seen above.

The most interesting thing about prisons, however, is that the “rules” change all the time, especially for individuals who ostensibly deserve extra punishment for whatever reason. I’m not talking about a prisoner who breaks a rule and goes through a due process that is the same for everyone. I’m talking about a prisoner — like Albert Woodfox — who has been continually tormented for more than forty years because he was one of three men who organized a Black Panther Party chapter in Angola Penitentiary back in the early 1970’s and has now become an international icon of resistance to oppression. Oh, yes. And let’s not forget all the legal suits he’s won and the legal precedents he has set during all those years.

Anyway, the “rules” keep changing for our visits. First, the visits went from four hours to three hours and then they went down to two hours each. So instead of driving ten hours to get eight hours of visiting time, I now drive ten hours to get two 2-hour visits. But it gets worse.

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