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FDL Book Salon Welcomes Roz Savage, Stop Drifting, Start Rowing: One Woman’s Search for Happiness and Meaning Alone on the Pacific

Welcome Roz Savage (RozSavage.com) (Twitter) and Host EdwardTeller / Phil Munger (ProgressiveAlaska) (Twitter)

Stop Drifting, Start Rowing: One Woman’s Search for Happiness and Meaning Alone on the Pacific

Few books have gotten me to take entirely new looks at how one might bring attention to the ongoing human-activity-induced extinctions and impending mass extinctions of so much around us as has this one. Why?

First, it is an adventure fraught with dangers. How many of us would welcome getting back alone into a 23-foot boat, to row it across yet another multi-thousand mile stretch of ocean, after having had several close encounters with death in that same vessel before? To bring attention to the masses – thousands of square miles! – of plastic trash accumulating in the great oceanic gyre points around the globe.

One in a thousand? One in 100,000? Maybe one in a billion.

Second, how many of us might even put such a venture together, hatched out of inspiration and dedication verging on the edge of sanity, in the first place? And then, while striving to eke out a mile at a time, a few miles per day – or less – while keeping up with the world so distant, through radiotelephone, the internet, social media and what news one might catch, write blog posts that are truly inspirational?

One in a thousand? One in 100,000? Maybe one in a billion.

Third, how many of us might be able to, after succeeding at all this, turn her efforts (and those of her hundreds of material and spiritual supporters) into something more meaningful, as she links with and networks among many of the leading environmental and ecological thinkers active today?

Not many.

Roz Savage’s second book, Stop Drifting, Start Rowing: One Woman’s Search for Happiness and Meaning Alone on the Pacific, chronicles the Pacific Ocean-crossing phase of the author’s record-setting single-handed row around much of the world. It was not one journey, but a series of them, beginning with what might easily have turned out to be a tragedy, when, after two capsizes, she was all but forced to abandon her tiny vessel off the coast of northern California, and leap overboard into fifteen-foot breaking waves, in August, 2007:

She had been my prison cell, but also my life-support capsule. I owed my life to her. But now I was abandoning her. I felt a harsh pang of guilt and an overwhelming sense that I was making a bad mistake.

Meanwhile, a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter began to hover overhead. A diver jumped out of it, tethered to the chopper:

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Philip Munger

Philip Munger

musician, composer, educator, environmental and community planning activist