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Following Drone Strike in Pakistan, Report Filed with Police Accuses Unidentified Persons of Murder

Pakistanis protesting drones block NATO supply route with sit-in (via @QueensOfJannah1)

A formal complaint known as a First Information Report (FIR) has been filed by provincial government officials and local police in the aftermath of a drone strike in Pakistan that hit an Islamic school in the Hangu district of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. The strike killed at least five people.

According to various media sources, police station chief Farid Khan said the complaint accused “unidentified persons” of launching “four missiles in the drone strike on November 21.”

The information submitted accused the individuals of violating sections of the Anti-Terrorism Act and the Pakistan Penal Code that prohibit murder, attempted murder, illegal use of explosives and terrorism.

FIRs essentially are a first step in a criminal investigation. They encourage police to do a follow-up to see if crimes were truly committed.

This kind of filing is considered to be the first of its kind. It represents an example of the growing resistance to US drones in the country.

Part of what set off so much outrage was the fact that the drone strike occurred in a settled urban area of Pakistan, which has rarely happened. Strikes typically occur in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

Several suggested this strike might mean the CIA would be more willing to follow suspected militants from tribal areas to urban areas of the country to kill them.

Those killed were Noorullah, Hamidullah, Ahmed Jan, Gul Marjan and Abdul Rehman, according to The Express. Each of these people were taken to Afghanistan to be buried. Ahmed Jan, also known as Maulana Ahmad Jan, was a “spiritual leader” for the Haqqani network. He and others had been at the attacked seminary, which was a “rest base” for militants fighting NATO forces.

The Haqqani network has never been implicated in any attacks on the US homeland. The group is not a part of al Qaeda, although its members are believed to have cooperated with al Qaeda in the past. The members are not senior members of al Qaeda, which President Barack Obama has claimed are the people the US government targets in drone strikes.

Although numerous Pakistani officials, including Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf’s Imran Khan, have publicly suggested that the strike on November 21 killed children, none of the people killed were children. They are believed to have each been from Afghanistan.

Meanwhile, a major demonstration against US drones was held today to block a NATO supply route the US uses to get supplies to troops in Afghanistan. Khan told thousands of protesters, “We will put pressure on America, and our protest will continue if drone attacks are not stopped.”

Twenty-one year-old university student Hussain Shah said to Dawn.com, “I am participating in today’s sit-in to convey a message to America that we hate them since they are killing our people in drone attacks. America must stop drone attacks for peace in our country.”

The protest was called in response to the strike that hit the Hangu seminary.

Yet, despite all the anger and animosity against the US, officials from the Obama administration told Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif this week that the drone strikes would not be stopping anytime soon.

There are militant groups that the Pakistani government might want to use as intermediaries in peace talks to negotiate an end to some of the chaos and violence in the country. But the Obama administration is unremittingly indifferent to the concerns of Pakistanis, and, no matter how much people protest, the administration is not about to respect the sovereignty of Pakistan.

Inarguably, US indifference leaves Pakistani government officials mostly powerless. Part of the government looked the other way for multiple years and, now that its leaders are responding to those outraged by the drones, the US is probably telling them the strikes won’t stop the job started is complete (whatever that might be).

Officials and political leaders see obstructing the military occupation in Afghanistan, which is now likely to extend past 2024, or filing charges against those who press the trigger and kill people in local provinces where strikes occur as one of the few ways to resist continued US drone strikes.

CommunityFDL Main BlogThe Dissenter

Following Drone Strike in Pakistan, Report Filed With Police Accuses Unidentified Persons of Murder

Pakistanis protesting drones block NATO supply route with sit-in

A formal complaint known as a First Information Report has been filed by provincial government officials and local police in the aftermath of a drone strike in Pakistan that hit an Islamic school in the Hangu district of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. The strike killed at least five people.

According to various media sources, police station chief Farid Khan said the complaint accused “unidentified persons” of launching “four missiles in the drone strike on November 21.”

The information submitted accused the individuals of violating sections of the Anti-Terrorism Act and the Pakistan Penal Code that prohibit murder, attempted murder, illegal use of explosives and terrorism.

This kind of filing is considered to be the first of its kind. It represents an example of the growing resistance to US drones in the country.

Part of what set off so much outrage was the fact that the drone strike occurred in a settled urban area of Pakistan, which has rarely happened. Strikes typically occur in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

Several suggested this strike might mean the CIA would be more willing to follow suspected militants from tribal areas to urban areas of the country to kill them.

Those killed were Noorullah, Hamidullah, Ahmed Jan, Gul Marjan and Abdul Rehman, according to The Express. Each of these people were taken to Afghanistan to be buried. Ahmed Jan, also known as Maulana Ahmad Jan, was a “spiritual leader” for the Haqqani network. He and others had been at the attacked seminary, which was a “rest base” for militants fighting NATO forces.

The Haqqani network has never been implicated in any attacks on the US homeland. The group is not a part of al Qaeda, although its members are believed to have cooperated with al Qaeda in the past. The members are not senior members of al Qaeda, which President Barack Obama has claimed are the people the US government targets in drone strikes.

Although numerous Pakistani officials, including Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf’s Imran Khan, have publicly suggested that the strike on November 21 killed children, none of the people killed were children. They are believed to have each been from Afghanistan.

Meanwhile, a major demonstration against US drones was held today to block a NATO supply route the US uses to get supplies to troops in Afghanistan. Khan told thousands of protesters, “We will put pressure on America, and our protest will continue if drone attacks are not stopped.”

Twenty-one year-old university student Hussain Shah said to Dawn.com, “I am participating in today’s sit-in to convey a message to America that we hate them since they are killing our people in drone attacks. America must stop drone attacks for peace in our country.” [cont’d.] (more…)

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Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola is managing editor of Shadowproof Press. He also produces and co-hosts the weekly podcast, "Unauthorized Disclosure."

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