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Dirty Details: Dents, Faulty Welds Found Along Keystone XL Southern Half in Texas

Cross-Posted from DeSmogBlog

If an ecologically hazardous accident happens to TransCanada’s Keystone XL(KXL) tar sands pipeline, we can’t say we weren’t forewarned. That’s the latest from a press release and YouTube video recently disseminated by the good government group, Public Citizen.

Public Citizen‘s Texas office explained, “Dozens of anomalies, including dents and welds, reportedly have been identified along a 60-mile stretch of the southern segment of the Keystone XL pipeline, north of the Sabine River in Texas.”

A recent report appearing in The Houston Chronicle revealed KXL’s southern half is over 75-percent complete and will be on-line by late-2013. That half of the pipeline brings tar sands – also known as diluted bitumen, or “dilbit” – from Cushing, OK (dubbed the “pipeline cross-roads of the world“) down to Port Arthur, TX, where it ends up exported to the global market.

KXL’s northern half is still in its proposal phase. Its eventual fate sits entirely in the hands of President Barack Obama and his U.S. State Department because it’s a border-crossing pipeline. In March 2012, President Obama issued an Executive Order for expediting building of KXL’s southern half.

Earlier this year, Tar Sands Blockade – a group committed to creative non-violent direct action to stop the building of KXL’s southern half – also detected defective welding in the pipeline, akin go that discovered by Public Citizen. The group did so when one of its activists went inside of the pipeline and discovered light seeping through it.

Despite this new concrete evidence from both Public Citizen and Tar Sands Blockade, the State Dept. recently denied Friends of the Earth-U.S.‘s (FOE) request to have its key Freedom of Information Act request expedited, one which would likely expose Big Oil’s influence over State’s KXL northern half decision. State argued the request doesn’t “meet any of the established criteria” for expedition, though Public Citizen‘s latest spate of findings shows otherwise.

Faulty Welding: Dirt’s in the Details, Detail’s in the Dirt

An old adage goes, “the dirt’s always in the details” one digs up. So too with this latest revelation by Public Citizen – both figuratively and literally.

“Some of the new pipeline has been in the ground on some owners’ land for almost six months,” Public Citizen‘s news release reads. “Landowners are concerned that this digging is indicative of faulty pipeline along the route that could potentially leak and threaten water supplies, and have requested TransCanada and the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) to provide more information about the work.”

The “dirt” in this situation was excavated not merely through landowner speculation, but straight from TransCanada’s own contractors.

“The anomalies and other problems were reported to landowners along the line…by several TransCanada vendors, including an independent inspector and a right-of-way representative,” Public Citizen further explained, also writing that each “marked section [has] a stake that reads ‘Anomaly.’”

“Anomaly” or More of the Same?

Yet, is any of this really an “anomaly”? Again, the “dirt’s in the details.” [cont’d]

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