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Nicolas Maduro Wins Venezuelan Presidency: An Open Thread

http://youtu.be/9KSG8z7r2EA

Most major media are focused on Capriles’ charges of ‘over 3200 electoral incidents’ that caused Maduro to win (read: rigging the election’) this morning.  In the run-up to the election, they also trumpeted the fact that there are deep divisions within the nation (heh), and the ‘hideous shape’ the nation’s infrastructure (including power generation), economy and oil revenue decreases is in, all, of course, down to Hugo Chavez’s corruption and mismanagement.  Only independent media have brought us the other side of the story.  I only wish I’d ever know half of it before Hugo’s death.  The attacks are obviously underpinned by the hatred of socialism, and the fact that it was a people’s movement that launched him into the Presidency.  Oh, and…his nationalizing the oil industry.  ‘Regime change’ is on the docket.

Jack Balkwill of Liberty Underground News had this to say this morning; his headline was: The Bolivarian Revolution Continues’:

Among news media where most Americans get their news, most brought up election irregularities suggesting interference by the socialist government, but none questioned whether there had been cheating by the oligarch candidate, despite polls predicting he would lose by double digits prior to the election (if he did so much better than predicted, why wouldn’t he be the one accused of cheating?). 

Many in corporate media alleged that Venezuelan state media played a role in the socialist victory, but none pointed out that the overwhelming majority of the Venezuelan mass media are under the control of the oligarchs and supported Capriles. 

NPR, after a week of reporting misinformation about the election, by their “journalist” Steve Inskeep, broadcasting from Venezuela, were unable to influence a win for the oligarchs so that millions of Venezuelans could be denied health care, food, shelter and other necessities, taking the nation back to conditions before Chavez began the Bolivarian Revolution.  But of course, their primary effort is to keep Americans in the dark, as we so often point out.

The website Venezuelan Analysis has a brief commentary on the election; in part:

Maracaibo, April 14th, 2013 (Venezuelanalysis.com) – Nicolas Maduro has won the Venezuelan presidential election with 50.66 percent of the vote against 49.07 percent for opposition candidate Henrique Capriles Radonski. Maduro gave a victory speech immediately after, while Capriles initially refused to recognize the results. [snip]

Given the closeness of the vote, Maduro’s speech focused mostly on assuring the validity of his victory, and the reliability of the electoral body.

“If they want to do an audit, then do an audit. We have complete trust in our electoral body,” he said from outside the presidential palace.  We have the only electoral body in the world in which 54 percent of the total votes are audited,” he added.

Maduro also noted that in other countries presidents often win by slim margins, and that it is recognized as a victory, and said to opposition sectors that “this is no reason to create violence”.

CNE Rector Vicente Díaz immediately requested that 100 percent of the electoral results be audited in order to make the results more transparent.  “This tight result has lead me to request that the CNE conduct a citizens’ audit of 100 percent of the ballot boxes. The country needs it,” he said.

Maduro immediately accepted the request, and assured there was no problem in doing a complete audit.

“Let’s do it! No problem. Perhaps they will find that my victory will be larger,” he said.

Here is VA’s piece on their take on the ‘irregularities’, including this:

Capriles’ campaign team also disagreed with the voting participation rates reported by the government. His campaign coordinator Ramon Aveledo said that only 4.5 million had voted by 11am, quoting the CNE as his source.

Capriles said that Rodriguez had announced the so called exaggerated turn-out numbers “in  order to disrupt the process, because we all know what’s happening”.

Later today, just before 6pm, Capriles wrote on his Twitter account that the government was announcing “results that don’t exist, be aware! that’s their speciality”.

At the same time, Nicolas Maduro’s Twitter account, as well as the PSUV’s one, were hacked. The hacking, rude and making fun of the candidate, has been done by someone registered as “Lulzsecperu”. Also, there has been some opposition led violence in Sucre, Miranda state.

Candidate for the government, Nicolas Maduro voted this afternoon in Catia, Caracas, and also promised to accept the results, “even if I lose by one vote, but if I win by one vote I will be the president of the republic”.

Capriles’ campaign team also disagreed with the voting participation rates reported by the government. His campaign coordinator Ramon Aveledo said that only 4.5 million had voted by 11am, quoting the CNE as his source.

Capriles said that Rodriguez had announced the so called exaggerated turn-out numbers “in  order to disrupt the process, because we all know what’s happening”.

Later today, just before 6pm, Capriles wrote on his Twitter account that the government was announcing “results that don’t exist, be aware! that’s their speciality”.

At the same time, Nicolas Maduro’s Twitter account, as well as the PSUV’s one, were hacked. The hacking, rude and making fun of the candidate, has been done by someone registered as “Lulzsecperu”. Also, there has been some opposition led violence in Sucre, Miranda state.

Candidate for the government, Nicolas Maduro voted this afternoon in Catia, Caracas, and also promised to accept the results, “even if I lose by one vote, but if I win by one vote I will be the president of the republic”.

From Democracy Now:  ‘We host a debate between Rory Carroll, author of “Comandante: Hugo Chávez’s Venezuela,” and Mark Weisbrot, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research.’

Please add your two cents, two bucks, speculation, knowledge, opinions…at will.  Especially as to: Will the results stand?  As in: be allowed to stand?

I  do hope that our amigo wayoutwest comes to offer his insights on this; he knows a lot about the Bolivarian Revolution; I don’t.  There are a number of others here that are well-versed as well, and I’m sorry I can’t name them/you off the top of my head.

Also, are any other diarists having trouble with the blogging software here?  I keep having trouble on both tabs lately.

 

(to be cross-posted at wendyedavis.net)

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