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“Frackademia” Strikes Again at USC With “Powering California” Study Release

Cross-Posted from DeSmogBlog

Frackademia” – shorthand for bogus science, economics and other research results paid for by the oil and gas industry and often conducted by “frackademics” with direct ties to the oil and gas industry – has struck again in California.

It comes in the form of a major University of Southern California (USC) report on the potential economic impacts of a hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) boom in California’sMonterey Shale basin that’s hot off the presses, “Powering California: The Monterey Shale and California’s Economic Future.”

California Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown recently gave his cautious support to fracking, the toxic process via which oil and gas embedded deep within shale rock basins made famous by the documentary film “Gasland,” currently a topic of contention in California. The new report gleefully says we could be witnessing 1849 all over again, the second-coming of a “Gold Rush,” a term the co-authors utilize 9 times in the Preface.

The report, co-authored by a Los Angeles-based public relations firm, The Communications Institute (TCI), concludes that “development of the 1,750-square-mile formation in central California could generate half a million new jobs by 2015 and 2.8 million by 2020,” as reported by The Los Angeles Times, which blared the headline, “Tapping California shale oil could add millions of jobs, study says.”

Given California’s population of 37,683,933 people, this would mean 7.4 percent of the state’s citizens can gain employment and economic uplift from the industry. It would also shrink the 20.3-percent unemployment rate in the Golden State down drastically, to 12.9 percent.

“The Monterey shale would help stimulate the California economy to a significant extent,” USC professor and co-author Adam Rose told The Times. “It’s not just a benefit to the oil industry. These impacts ripple throughout the economy.”

While a nice sentiment, the age-old questions quickly arise: who are the authors and who funded this study?

The answers to these questions, a DeSmogBlog investigation has revealed, paints an entirely different picture of the report’s findings and how it came to such rosy conclusions.

Study Funded by Big Oil, Co-Author’s Industry Connections Tell the Story

Off the bat, the report acknowledges financial support – though failing to disclose how much funding – from the Western States Petroleum Asssociation (WSPA). WSPA, “the oldest petroleum industry trade association in the United States,” has a membership list that includes Chevron, ExxonMobil, Occidental Oil and Gas Corporation and Shell, to name several. All of these corporations are actively involved in exploration and prospective production of the Monterey Shale.

Just as importantly, one of the co-authors of the “study” – Fred Aminzadeh – is currently an oil and gas industry employee.

Aminzadeh serves as a Research Professor and Executive Director at USC’s Global Energy Network (GEN) and Executive Director of USC’s Reservoir Monitoring Consortium (RMC) and worked in various technical and management positions at Unocal – purchased by Chevron in 2005 – for 17 years.

GEN, credited as one of the report’s lead conductors, does not list its funders, but given the steep membership fee – ranging between $25,000-$500,000 per year – one can safely guess that at least some of its funding comes from the deep pockets of the oil and gas industry. In fact, BP America, ExxonMobil, Chevron, Anadarko and General Electric all have members sitting on GEN’s Advisory Board.

[cont’d.]

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