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Maybe we’re trying too hard

There have been several theories about how Chief Justice Roberts became the fifth vote to uphold the Affordable Care Act.

1. He switched at the last minute because the other conservatives went too far;
2. He cared about the legacy of the “Robert’s Court”;
3. He could help undermine Lochner by rejecting the commerce clause by relying on the tax aspects of the mandate;
4. His “seizures” caused him to go all goofy (good ol’ slimy Drudge)
5. He was blackmailed by David Axelrod;
6. He decided he was the worst traitor since Benedict Arnold or Barack O’Clenis.

But maybe the usual answer is the best answer?

Hospitals, drugmakers and biotech companies are expected to be flush with new customers because of the law’s requirement that most Americans have insurance by 2014 or pay a fine. Insurers also are expected to experience a boon

Meanwhile, before their hopes and dreams of overturning years of legal precedent were foiled by years of legal precedent there was finally an alternative to “Obamacare” forming on the right — stop if you’d heard of this one before — the death panel:

Megyn Kelly hosted a panel of doctors to discuss the Affordable Care Act (aka Obama Care) yesterday – and I’m sure you’ll be shocked to know that all three of them opposed it. But what really was shocking was their reasoning that it would create too many patients which would negatively impact those who already have coverage. Rather than consider ways to increase health care providers, they all seemed to think the solution was to make sure there weren’t too many health care consumers. In other words, people should go without treatment so that those who already have coverage are not inconvenienced. Even worse, the doctors complained that too many people would “overuse” medical services.

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Attaturk

Attaturk

In 1949, I decided to wrestle professionally, starting my career in Texas. In my debut, I defeated Abe Kashey, with former World Heavyweight boxing Champion Jack Dempsey as the referee. In 1950, I captured the NWA Junior Heavyweight title. In 1953, I won the Chicago version of the NWA United States Championship. I became one of the most well-known stars in wrestling during the golden age of television, thanks to my exposure on the Dumont Network, where I wowed audiences with my technical prowess. I was rumored to be one of the highest paid wrestlers during the 1950s, reportedly earning a hundred thousand dollars a year. My specialty was "the Sleeper Hold" and the founding of modern, secular, Turkey.

Oops, sorry, that's the biography of Verne Gagne with a touch of Mustafa Kemal.

I'm just an average moron who in reality is a practicing civil rights and employment attorney in fly-over country .

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