Early this morning the final two Super Tuesday states, Alaska and Ohio, were called for Mitt Romney. Those victories brought Romney’s total for Super Tuesday to six of ten, including his wins in Idaho, Massachusetts, Vermont and Virginia.

That is twice as many as the three wins Rick Santorum got: Oklahoma, Tennessee and North Dakota. It is also significantly better than Newt Gingrich, who managed to win only his home state of Georgia and not even take second in any other state.

Romney didn’t just win more states.  As a result of his big margins in several, he was able to net significantly more delegates than any other candidate. It will now be extremely hard for any other candidate to catch up to him in the delegate count.

While Romney had a very good night, it was not good enough to end the primary fight quickly. Santorum’s three wins and narrow loss in Ohio show he can keep running and keep winning states. It also again proves that Romney has real trouble in the South and mid-America.

This  means there will likely be at least a month or more to this primary. Looking ahead, the rest of March could be a chance for Santorum to regain the momentum. Still to vote this month are Kansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Hawaii, Illinois, Missouri and Louisiana. The vast majority could potentially be trouble for Romney, who struggles with evangelicals and lower income voters.

The one possible saving grace for Romney is that for some reason Gingrich claims that doing well only in his own home state proves he still has a chance at the nomination.  Having Gingrich remain in the race should help split anti-Romney voting in the upcoming Southern primaries. This could prevent Santorum from netting a lot of delegates to help close the gap with Romney.

After Super Tuesday the delegate count and the basic voting patterns make it very hard to imagine how Romney could possibly lose, but it is still likely to be a long ugly road to the nomination.

Romney won 6 of 10 on Super Tuesday (photo: Gage Skidmore)

Early this morning the final two Super Tuesday states, Alaska and Ohio, were called for Mitt Romney. Those victories brought Romney’s total for Super Tuesday to six of ten, including his wins in Idaho, Massachusetts, Vermont and Virginia.

That is twice as many as the three wins Rick Santorum got: Oklahoma, Tennessee and North Dakota. It is also significantly better than Newt Gingrich, who managed to win only his home state of Georgia and not even take second in any other state.

Romney didn’t just win more states.  As a result of his big margins in several, he was able to net significantly more delegates than any other candidate. It will now be extremely hard for any other candidate to catch up to him in the delegate count.

While Romney had a very good night, it was not good enough to end the primary fight quickly. Santorum’s three wins and narrow loss in Ohio show he can keep running and keep winning states. It also again proves that Romney has real trouble in the South and mid-America.

This  means there will likely be at least a month or more to this primary. Looking ahead, the rest of March could be a chance for Santorum to regain the momentum. Still to vote this month are Kansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Hawaii, Illinois, Missouri and Louisiana. The vast majority could potentially be trouble for Romney, who struggles with evangelicals and lower income voters.

The one possible saving grace for Romney is that for some reason Gingrich claims that doing well only in his own home state proves he still has a chance at the nomination.  Having Gingrich remain in the race should help split anti-Romney voting in the upcoming Southern primaries. This could prevent Santorum from netting a lot of delegates to help close the gap with Romney.

After Super Tuesday the delegate count and the basic voting patterns make it very hard to imagine how Romney could possibly lose, but it is still likely to be a long ugly road to the nomination.

Jon Walker

Jon Walker

Jonathan Walker grew up in New Jersey. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2006. He is an expert on politics, health care and drug policy. He is also the author of After Legalization and Cobalt Slave, and a Futurist writer at http://pendinghorizon.com

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