While the Republicans have made it clear President Obama’s American Jobs Act is dead on arrival in Congress, most of the individual provisions meant to spur job creation in the bill are broadly popular according to Gallup.
As you may know, President Obama has submitted a bill to Congress that includes a number of proposals designed to create jobs in the United States. Please tell whether you favor or oppose each of the following proposals. September 2011

From a political perspective at least, the Obama campaign should be able to score some points with voters when they point out the Republicans refuse to spend money on a popular idea like fixing up old schools.

I think it is very interesting that the most expensive provision in the bill, the payroll tax cut, is also the only idea that lacks majority support. The idea is not particular popular with Republicans/Republican leaners (41%) or Democrats/Democratic leaners (52%).  [cont’d.]

I would love to find out why this is. It is possible the American people don’t think the payroll tax cut currently in place has been effective at creating jobs, or do Americans strongly support Social Security and don’t like seeing its funding source messed with?

I suspect part of it is that the payroll tax cut is the only provision that isn’t about directly creating jobs. It is easy to picture how giving businesses money to hire new people, giving local governments money to hire people, and giving schools money to hire people to repair buildings would all directly increase the number of jobs. On the other hand, mentally it requires a few steps to picture how a modest payroll tax cut will cause millions people to spend some money, therefore increasing demand, which in turn makes businesses decide they need to hire more people to handle the slightly increased demand.

While there seems to be this idea in Washington that the American people love tax cuts, polling shows it simply is not the case. The top problem right now for the American people is unemployment and what they want is the government to take actions to directly put our unemployed citizens to work.

Since the law is not going to pass, it seems Obama erred again politically by making his newest plan to stimulate the economy very tax cut heavily. I think if instead of asking to spend $175 billion on a payroll tax cut, he should have demanded $175 billion be spent on a WPA-style program to directly hire 3.5 million Americans at roughly $50,000 a year each. It would have been more popular and it would have been much easier for regular people to conceptualize that it would directly make a big dent in our jobs crisis.

The American people couldn’t be clearer that what they want now is jobs, jobs and jobs.

While the Republicans have made it clear President Obama’s American Jobs Act is dead on arrival in Congress, most of the individual provisions meant to spur job creation in the bill are broadly popular according to Gallup.
As you may know, President Obama has submitted a bill to Congress that includes a number of proposals designed to create jobs in the United States. Please tell whether you favor or oppose each of the following proposals. September 2011

From a political perspective at least, the Obama campaign should be able to score some points with voters when they point out the Republicans refuse to spend money on a popular idea like fixing up old schools.

I think it is very interesting that the most expensive provision in the bill, the payroll tax cut, is also the only idea that lacks majority support. The idea is not particular popular with Republicans/Republican leaners (41%) or Democrats/Democratic leaners (52%).

I would love to find out why this is. It is possible the American people don’t think the payroll tax cut currently in place has been effective at creating jobs. Or do Americans strongly support Social Security and don’t like seeing its funding source messed with?

I suspect part of it is that the payroll tax cut is the only provision that isn’t about directly creating jobs. It is easy to picture how giving businesses money to hire new people, giving local governments money to hire people and giving schools money to hire people to repair buildings would directly increase the number of jobs. On the other hand, mentally it requires a few steps to picture how a modest payroll tax cut will cause millions of people to spend some money, therefore increasing demand, which in turn makes businesses decide they need to hire more people to handle the slightly increased demand.

While Washington seems to have this idea that the American people love tax cuts, polling shows it simply is not the case. The top problem right now for the American people is unemployment and what they want is the government to take actions to directly put our unemployed citizens to work.

Since the law is not going to pass, it seems Obama erred again politically by making his newest plan to stimulate the economy very tax cut heavily. Instead of asking to spend $175 billion on a payroll tax cut, he should have demanded $175 billion be spent on a WPA-style program to directly hire 3.5 million Americans at roughly $50,000 a year each. It would have been more popular, and it would have been much easier for regular people to conceptualize that it would directly make a big dent in our jobs crisis.

The American people couldn’t be clearer that what they want now is jobs, jobs and jobs.

Jon Walker

Jon Walker

Jonathan Walker grew up in New Jersey. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2006. He is an expert on politics, health care and drug policy. He is also the author of After Legalization and Cobalt Slave, and a Futurist writer at http://pendinghorizon.com