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White House’s Scooby Doo Villain Perspective on Politics

The Obama administration has a strange habit of inappropriately blaming the unpopularity of their actions on the fact that a few progressive writers didn’t do enough to sell the public on the good aspects of their deal.

It would seem the White House is basically taking the perspective of a Scooby Doo villain in concluding why their brilliant plans fail. Hanging upside down in a comically oversize net with their rubber monster mask removed they yell, “we would have gotten away with it, too, if it hadn’t been for you meddling progressive bloggers!”

A Scooby Doo villain may think he has the incredible misfortune of the world’s most brilliant detective team arriving in his small town at the wrong moment to point out to everyone the tiny flaw in an otherwise ingenious scheme. The villain’s real problem is that running around at night in a crude rubber swamp monster outfit trying to scare everyone away from the old mill was just an incredibly stupid plan.

While it is true that a van full of unemployed teenage stoners may have been the first to point out the dozens of obvious problems with the plan, the scheme was so ill-conceived the villain was never going to get away with it anyway. It didn’t fail because of the meddling kids. If a cartoon dog and a thick-witted hippie can quickly locate all its problems, it wasn’t all that brilliant to begin with.

Similarly, the problem for the White House is not that a few hippie bloggers are pointing out the clear and obvious problems with their policies. The problem is that the policies are bad, and their unpopularity is due to the fact that they fails to deliver what they promise.

If people see the the positive tangible effect that a policy has on their lives, they won’t care what anyone has to say about it. Likewise, if a handful of writers sign on to the White House Happy Talk PR campaign, bad policy will never become broadly popular. The administration’s failure to convince either bloggers or the public about the benefits of a particular action is most likely a signal that it is insufficient, ineffective, destructive or incompetent.

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White House’s Scooby Doo Villain Perspective on Politics

The Obama administration has a strange habit of inappropriately blaming the unpopularity of their actions on the fact that a few progressive writers didn’t do enough to sell the public on the good aspects of their deal.

It would seem the White House is basically taking the perspective of a Scooby Doo villain in concluding why their brilliant plans fail. Hanging upside down in a comically oversize net with their rubber monster mask removed they yell, “we would have gotten away with it, too, if it hadn’t been for you meddling progressive bloggers!”

A Scooby Doo villain may think he has the incredible misfortune of the world’s most brilliant detective team arriving in his small town at the wrong moment to point out to everyone the tiny flaw in an otherwise ingenious scheme. The villain’s real problem is that running around at night in a crude rubber swamp monster outfit trying to scare everyone away from the old mill was just an incredibly stupid plan.

While it is true that a van full of unemployed teenage stoners may have been the first to point out the dozens of obvious problems with the plan, the scheme was so ill-conceived the villain was never going to get away with it anyway. It didn’t fail because of the meddling kids. If a cartoon dog and a thick-witted hippie can quickly locate all its problems, it wasn’t all that brilliant to begin with.

Similarly, the problem for the White House is not that a few hippie bloggers are pointing out the clear and obvious problems with their policies. The problem is that the policies are bad,  and their unpopularity is due to the fact that they fails to deliver what they promise.

If people see the the positive tangible effect that a policy has on their lives, they won’t care what anyone has to say about it.  Likewise, if a handful of writers sign on to the White House Happy Talk PR campaign, bad policy will never become broadly popular.  The administration’s failure to convince either bloggers or the public about the benefits of a particular action is most likely a signal that it is insufficient, ineffective, destructive or incompetent.

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Jon Walker

Jon Walker

Jonathan Walker grew up in New Jersey. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2006. He is an expert on politics, health care and drug policy. He is also the author of After Legalization and Cobalt Slave, and a Futurist writer at http://pendinghorizon.com