As the News Corp phone hacking scandal continues to grow and envelop US newspapers and media organizations, which are owned by Rupert Murdoch and part of the News Corp family, the management of each of these papers and organizations are working overtime to defend Murdoch from the criticism. And, in a recent editorial addressing the business of news and those who are criticizing members of the News Corp family, the Wall Street Journal delivers a dig against papers like The Guardian that have done business with WikiLeaks.

The editorial argues the phone hacking scandal “years ago at a British corner of News Corp. to the Journal” is possibly being used to “injure press freedom general.” It agrees that the phone hacking is “deplorable” and those responsible are likely to be prosecuted. It suggests News of the World violated its readers’ trust. But, at the same time, the editorial asks, “Do our media brethren really want to invite Congress and prosecutors to regulate how journalists gather the news?”—a question that foretells of the next Tea Party battle cry: “Keep your government hands off my newspaper!” (And, of course, I’m talking about the Tea Party defending the New York Post, not the Wall Street Journal. You have to like to read to care about protecting the WSJ from the government.)

Here’s the section where the WSJ editorial staff take a cheap shot against newspapers like The Guardianthat have worked with WikiLeaks. After outlining how News Corps has invested in the WSJ, making it possible for foreign coverage to expand, for digital delivery to be launched and for the weekend edition to become more substantial, the editorial asserts:

Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola is managing editor of Shadowproof. He also produces and co-hosts the weekly podcast, "Unauthorized Disclosure."