The past several years have seen a monumental shift in Americans’ thinking about foreign policy according to a new Pew poll. The number of Americans that think the United States should be active in world affairs has drop 11 points from 2004.

The biggest change has been among conservative Republicans, which has totally flipped from supporting neo-conservative foreign policy in 2004 to now most supporting an isolationist position.

The good news is that the American people do learn from our mistakes, it is just too bad it took nearly a decade of two disastrously wars to teach us the lesson.

Politically we are starting to see this major shift in foreign policy thinking among likely Republican primary voters starting to be reflected in the Republican presidential primary race and among Congressional Republicans. For example, you have both Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman starting to sound more skeptical about Afghanistan war.

With the American people focused on the economy and this current wave of deficit hysteria causing more to serious question the cost of our wars, it is likely Americans may become even more isolationist as we approach the 2012 election.

The past several years have seen a monumental shift in Americans’ thinking about foreign policy according to a new Pew poll. The number of Americans that think the United States should be active in world affairs has drop 11 points from 2004.

The biggest change has been among conservative Republicans, which has totally flipped from supporting neo-conservative foreign policy in 2004 to now most supporting an isolationist position.

The good news is that the American people do learn from our mistakes, it is just too bad it took nearly a decade of two disastrously wars to teach us the lesson.

Politically we are starting to see this major shift in foreign policy thinking among likely Republican primary voters starting to be reflected in the Republican presidential primary race and among Congressional Republicans. For example, you have both Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman starting to sound more skeptical about Afghanistan war.

With the American people focused on the economy and this current wave of deficit hysteria causing more to serious question the cost of our wars, it is likely Americans may become even more isolationist as we approach the 2012 election.

Jon Walker

Jon Walker

Jonathan Walker grew up in New Jersey. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2006. He is an expert on politics, health care and drug policy. He is also the author of After Legalization and Cobalt Slave, and a Futurist writer at http://pendinghorizon.com