From Servicemembers Legal Defense Network comes this video paying tribute to fallen Iraq Veteran Alan Greg Rogers. More on Major Rogers from the Arlington Cemetary website:

He was a soldier first, and that was clear when Army Major Alan G. Rogers was buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. Rifles were fired. A bugler played taps. An Army chaplain said the decorated officer would be remembered as “one of the heroes of history.”

After high school, Rogers attended Santa Fe Community College, then enlisted in the Army as a chaplain's assistant. Four years later, he went to the University of Florida. He graduated with a theology degree in 1995 and accepted an Army commission. He became an ordained minister through his Florida church, his family said. In 2005, Rogers earned a master's degree in policy management at Georgetown University as part of a selective program meant to fast-track the next generation of Army leaders.

Some pictures from the Arlington Cemetery site:

Photobucket

Photobucket
An Army caisson carries Army Major Alan Greg Rogers during funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery

Photobucket
Friends, both in and out of the military, pay tribute to Army Major Alan Greg Rogers Friday, march 14, 2008, during funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery

Photobucket
An honor guard lowers Rogers's coffin during a recent service at Arlington National Cemetery. The officer was awarded a Purple Heart posthumously and his second Bronze Star, then laid to rest. His cousin said Rogers was “the type of son who was always so good to his parents,” who died in 2000.

There is no mention of Major Rogers being gay in his Arlington Cemetery entry, or that he served as treasurer for the American Veterans for Equal Rights (AVER) LGBT advocacy group.

Nor was mention made of it when his death was reported by the Washington Post and NPR. The omission stirred a rather unhappy response from the gay community, as Rogers was well-known in the LGBT servicemembers and DADT repeal community. Eventually the Washington Post ombudsman concluded the omission was a mistake:

The Post was right to be cautious, but there was enough evidence — particularly of Rogers's feelings about “don't ask, don't tell” — to warrant quoting his friends and adding that dimension to the story of his life. The story would have been richer for it.

There are people who would have you believe that gay people enlist in the military just to prowl the shower room, make fundamentalist Christian Chaplains suffer and to force their Radical Homosexual Agenda™ down the throats of others.

But Major Rogers was motivated by the same drives and impetus that other Americans enlist: to serve his God and his Country.

It is as simple as that.

Let them be out. In life and in death. It matters. Jeff and Lori Wilfahrt think so, they taped this video for Courage Campaign after their son, US Army Corporal Andrew Wilfahrt didn't return from Afghanistan.

Thank you, Major Rogers, Corporal Wilfahrt and the countless others who've served over the years, gay, straight and otherwise.

Now, let's certify the repeal of “Don't Ask, Don't Tell.”

 

From Servicemembers Legal Defense Network comes this video paying tribute to fallen Iraq Veteran Alan Greg Rogers. More on Major Rogers from the Arlington Cemetary website:

He was a soldier first, and that was clear when Army Major Alan G. Rogers was buried at Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors. Rifles were fired. A bugler played taps. An Army chaplain said the decorated officer would be remembered as “one of the heroes of history.”

(more…)

Clarknt67

Clarknt67