If you missed us this weekend, here’s what we had on the menu for Food Sunday and Saturday Art…

On Saturday Art, masaccio posted a piece about Waiting for the Verdict by Abraham Solomon:

Waiting for the Verdict by Abraham Solomon, is hanging at the D’Orsay, as part of a special exhibit, Crime and Punishment. It is owned by the Tunbridge Wells Museum and Art Gallery in Tunbridge Wells, England, about 40 miles southeast of London.

The D’Orsay is renovating the Impressionist wing, and has loaned out a number of those paintings during the renovation, and relocated some to the lower floors, displacing a lot of French Salon art and many of Honoré Daumier’s works. As a side note, the move shows us something important about Impressionist art: it loves light. The usual location is flooded with natural light. When it is shown in the side galleries, poorly lit by fluorescents, it loses its luster. Many of the paintings usually hung there actually benefit from that lack of light, their dark foreboding is multiplied.

Jake Remington had a piece entitled junkandfumefriends:

Bill Egnor had the latest chapter in his novel-in-progress:

Time spent on watch is malleable; it stretches; it compresses and generally flows unevenly. The Shadow liked to stand when on watch. He would take a position outside the light of the fire and stand, still as a tree, with only his eyes moving. In some ways it was nearly as good as sleep, putting the mind in a state that it will notice any threatening sounds or movement, but not really fully awake. This was the state that the Shadow was in as the moon set behind the mountains leaving the sky to the stars alone.

In his altered state, his mind noted, without concern, that the forest slowly went completely silent. It was just one fact that sat there, a bright spot, in a mind that was as still and dark as lake, in the night. Then a fog began to form all around the bottom of the hill, tendrils of mist snaking up from the main body of the cloud, like tentacles of a giant, white, sea creature. This fact was added to the strange silence, but again did not ring the bells of alarm in the watcher. It was, in fact, the smell that brought the Shadow to full consciousness. It was the smell of childhood, the remembered smell of high level evil, sharp in the back of his throat, brimstone and ashes, the smell of home.

Mitchell Frye brought us Street Art:

nagura posted a drawing from Asia:

Art Threat brought word of an interesting documentary, and an interview with its creators:

Anna Sarkissian and Ameesha Joshi are emerging filmmakers from Montreal, Quebec, currently making a documentary in India "on a shoestring budget" about women boxers called With this Ring. The synopsis from the film’s site:

Winning four world titles is not enough to get noticed in India, just ask 27 year-old boxing champion Mary Kom. She could have been a household name by now if she had chosen to pursue a more “ladylike” sport like tennis or ?eld hockey. Instead, she is ?ghting against centuries of tradition in a country that expects women to be sweet and docile. With cropped hair, de?ned shoulders and a mean left hook, she is anything but your typical Indian girl.

With This Ring lets you step into the ring with members of the Indian Women’s National Boxing Team. From their villages to the podium, these girls quickly rise to the top of their game. At the 4th World Women’s Boxing Competition in 2006, the Indian team makes a clean sweep, winning eight medals and the Championship Team title. They of?cially become the best women’s boxing team in the world. And the most under-appreciated.

Art Threat recently fired off a few questions to this dynamic duo. Their responses, with images, and a sneak peak video of the film are below.

And person1597 closed out the day with psychedelia:

How about something Exotic… How about an Event Horizon!

Infall_3

On Food Sunday, Toby Wollin kicked things off with the news:

Wow. It’s hot here today and we’re putting a new roof on one of the sheds. Or, rather the DH and The Boy are putting a new roof on and I am alternatively shaking pompoms, taking up iced tea, and doing little bits of work at the sewing machine and out on the north side of the house in the garden. But, enough of ME – to the news!!

First – no matter what you are doing for Fathers’ Day (hey, Dads – big smooch for all you do!), please check your local listings for the National Geographic Channel’s program on the Global Seed Bank in Norway. Nat. Geo. Seed Bank

Jill Richardson took on Rush Limbaugh:

Rush, a man known for abusing Oxycontin ("hillbilly heroin"), and being caught with illegal Viagra on a trip (sex trip?) to the Caribbean, and just being a general pig has now given some advice to hungry children. I can’t help but imagine that it’s his own diet strategy, and I must say: Rush, you’re a pig. What works for your drug-addled gasbag of a self is not appropriate for the nation’s youth.

Below, I’ve included the entire transcript of Rush’s remarks (telling hungry children to try dumpster diving and fast food) as well as the hunger advocacy group FRAC’s response and – for fun – a song about Rush Limbaugh. And – at the bottom of this diary – I’ve also included action steps for anyone interested in helping child hunger and malnutrition.

alanaclaire brought us a recipe for kohlrabi fries:

I sort of wish I could have fries every day.

My husband mourns my infrequent cooking of potatoes on a regular basis… "more potatoes!" he cries.

Yeah, I don’t feel so bad for him. He eats pretty well for a guy who was raised on taco bell with a side of pizza. When we met, I cooked a lot of tofu, and now I don’t. Now I have a half a pig and a whole lamb in my freezer. I’m open to input, especially when it keeps the marriage smooth (er).

But fries might be one of my favorite things- good fries- fancy or cheap as long as they are hot and not rubbery in any way. And really, I don’t cook so many potatoes because…well, really, what ever it is, I just think about how it should have been fries.

Jessica Glasscoe had her favorite cookies:

Is it? With a tall glass of cool milk, it’s a comforting end to a long day. It’s the sweetness you crave at 3:00 in the afternoon, when it seems like an eternity since lunch. And if you’re a baker, it’s the perfect thing to help you satisfy your need to bake something without getting out too many pots and pans, or making a trip to the store.

Some people like them chewy, others crispy, some with nuts, some without. Or what about the addition of oats, shaved chocolate, dried cherries, or cocoa nibs? Some people don’t give a gosh darn – they just want a hit of sugar, and don’t mind how it’s delivered. I like to say that I’ve never met a cookie I didn’t like, but like most people, I do have my ‘druthers’.

I almost never make the same chocolate chip cookie recipe twice – almost never. Usually I can’t resist the idea of stumbling across another great cookie recipe, and I hope that somewhere along the way, I will learn so much about what makes a cookie turn out the way it does, that I can develop my own perfect cookie. But certain cookies require loyalty, like this one, or my mom’s chocolate chocolate chip cookies, which are absurdly impossible to stop eating. More on these later.

And Bill Egnor taught us to make braided lemon bread:

IMG_0279

Happy Sunday Bread Heads! This week we are making a recipe which was requested. One of the folks reading this series asked for a lemon braid bread. She had seen it in a magazine some time ago. Having never made it she couldn’t tell me much about the bread, except that it was intended to be served at breakfast or tea with butter and strawberry jam.

I looked around and really did not come up with anything that was risen braided bread, which wasn’t already sweetened (take a look at this King Arthur Flour recipe for basically a lemon cheese Danish. I am sooo making this some time in the fall!) by lemon curd or some such. So, I figured I could put together a new recipe that would be bread that you can butter and still have that fresh lemon flavor.

Click through, check out the articles, and join us next weekend for more food and art!

If you missed us this weekend, here’s what we had on the menu for Food Sunday and Saturday Art…

On Saturday Art, masaccio posted a piece about Waiting for the Verdict by Abraham Solomon:

Waiting for the Verdict by Abraham Solomon, is hanging at the D’Orsay, as part of a special exhibit, Crime and Punishment. It is owned by the Tunbridge Wells Museum and Art Gallery in Tunbridge Wells, England, about 40 miles southeast of London.

The D’Orsay is renovating the Impressionist wing, and has loaned out a number of those paintings during the renovation, and relocated some to the lower floors, displacing a lot of French Salon art and many of Honoré Daumier’s works. As a side note, the move shows us something important about Impressionist art: it loves light. The usual location is flooded with natural light. When it is shown in the side galleries, poorly lit by fluorescents, it loses its luster. Many of the paintings usually hung there actually benefit from that lack of light, their dark foreboding is multiplied.

Jake Remington had a piece entitled junkandfumefriends:

Bill Egnor had the latest chapter in his novel-in-progress:

Time spent on watch is malleable; it stretches; it compresses and generally flows unevenly. The Shadow liked to stand when on watch. He would take a position outside the light of the fire and stand, still as a tree, with only his eyes moving. In some ways it was nearly as good as sleep, putting the mind in a state that it will notice any threatening sounds or movement, but not really fully awake. This was the state that the Shadow was in as the moon set behind the mountains leaving the sky to the stars alone.

In his altered state, his mind noted, without concern, that the forest slowly went completely silent. It was just one fact that sat there, a bright spot, in a mind that was as still and dark as lake, in the night. Then a fog began to form all around the bottom of the hill, tendrils of mist snaking up from the main body of the cloud, like tentacles of a giant, white, sea creature. This fact was added to the strange silence, but again did not ring the bells of alarm in the watcher. It was, in fact, the smell that brought the Shadow to full consciousness. It was the smell of childhood, the remembered smell of high level evil, sharp in the back of his throat, brimstone and ashes, the smell of home.

Mitchell Frye brought us Street Art:

nagura posted a drawing from Asia:

Art Threat brought word of an interesting documentary, and an interview with its creators:

Anna Sarkissian and Ameesha Joshi are emerging filmmakers from Montreal, Quebec, currently making a documentary in India "on a shoestring budget" about women boxers called With this Ring. The synopsis from the film’s site:

Winning four world titles is not enough to get noticed in India, just ask 27 year-old boxing champion Mary Kom. She could have been a household name by now if she had chosen to pursue a more “ladylike” sport like tennis or ?eld hockey. Instead, she is ?ghting against centuries of tradition in a country that expects women to be sweet and docile. With cropped hair, de?ned shoulders and a mean left hook, she is anything but your typical Indian girl.

With This Ring lets you step into the ring with members of the Indian Women’s National Boxing Team. From their villages to the podium, these girls quickly rise to the top of their game. At the 4th World Women’s Boxing Competition in 2006, the Indian team makes a clean sweep, winning eight medals and the Championship Team title. They of?cially become the best women’s boxing team in the world. And the most under-appreciated.

Art Threat recently fired off a few questions to this dynamic duo. Their responses, with images, and a sneak peak video of the film are below.

And person1597 closed out the day with psychedelia:

How about something Exotic… How about an Event Horizon!

Infall_3

On Food Sunday, Toby Wollin kicked things off with the news:

Wow. It’s hot here today and we’re putting a new roof on one of the sheds. Or, rather the DH and The Boy are putting a new roof on and I am alternatively shaking pompoms, taking up iced tea, and doing little bits of work at the sewing machine and out on the north side of the house in the garden. But, enough of ME – to the news!!

First – no matter what you are doing for Fathers’ Day (hey, Dads – big smooch for all you do!), please check your local listings for the National Geographic Channel’s program on the Global Seed Bank in Norway. Nat. Geo. Seed Bank

Jill Richardson took on Rush Limbaugh:

Rush, a man known for abusing Oxycontin ("hillbilly heroin"), and being caught with illegal Viagra on a trip (sex trip?) to the Caribbean, and just being a general pig has now given some advice to hungry children. I can’t help but imagine that it’s his own diet strategy, and I must say: Rush, you’re a pig. What works for your drug-addled gasbag of a self is not appropriate for the nation’s youth.

Below, I’ve included the entire transcript of Rush’s remarks (telling hungry children to try dumpster diving and fast food) as well as the hunger advocacy group FRAC’s response and – for fun – a song about Rush Limbaugh. And – at the bottom of this diary – I’ve also included action steps for anyone interested in helping child hunger and malnutrition.

alanaclaire brought us a recipe for kohlrabi fries:

I sort of wish I could have fries every day.

My husband mourns my infrequent cooking of potatoes on a regular basis… "more potatoes!" he cries.

Yeah, I don’t feel so bad for him. He eats pretty well for a guy who was raised on taco bell with a side of pizza. When we met, I cooked a lot of tofu, and now I don’t. Now I have a half a pig and a whole lamb in my freezer. I’m open to input, especially when it keeps the marriage smooth (er).

But fries might be one of my favorite things- good fries- fancy or cheap as long as they are hot and not rubbery in any way. And really, I don’t cook so many potatoes because…well, really, what ever it is, I just think about how it should have been fries.

Jessica Glasscoe had her favorite cookies:

Is it? With a tall glass of cool milk, it’s a comforting end to a long day. It’s the sweetness you crave at 3:00 in the afternoon, when it seems like an eternity since lunch. And if you’re a baker, it’s the perfect thing to help you satisfy your need to bake something without getting out too many pots and pans, or making a trip to the store.

Some people like them chewy, others crispy, some with nuts, some without. Or what about the addition of oats, shaved chocolate, dried cherries, or cocoa nibs? Some people don’t give a gosh darn – they just want a hit of sugar, and don’t mind how it’s delivered. I like to say that I’ve never met a cookie I didn’t like, but like most people, I do have my ‘druthers’.

I almost never make the same chocolate chip cookie recipe twice – almost never. Usually I can’t resist the idea of stumbling across another great cookie recipe, and I hope that somewhere along the way, I will learn so much about what makes a cookie turn out the way it does, that I can develop my own perfect cookie. But certain cookies require loyalty, like this one, or my mom’s chocolate chocolate chip cookies, which are absurdly impossible to stop eating. More on these later.

And Bill Egnor taught us to make braided lemon bread:

IMG_0279

Happy Sunday Bread Heads! This week we are making a recipe which was requested. One of the folks reading this series asked for a lemon braid bread. She had seen it in a magazine some time ago. Having never made it she couldn’t tell me much about the bread, except that it was intended to be served at breakfast or tea with butter and strawberry jam.

I looked around and really did not come up with anything that was risen braided bread, which wasn’t already sweetened (take a look at this King Arthur Flour recipe for basically a lemon cheese Danish. I am sooo making this some time in the fall!) by lemon curd or some such. So, I figured I could put together a new recipe that would be bread that you can butter and still have that fresh lemon flavor.

Click through, check out the articles, and join us next weekend for more food and art!

Jason Rosenbaum

Jason Rosenbaum

Writer, musician, activist. Currently consulting for Bill Halter for U.S. Senate and a fellow at the New Organizing Institute.

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