In case you missed us this weekend, here’s what we had cooking on Saturday Art and Food Sunday…

On Saturday Art, Mitchell Frye had a photograph from New York:

masaccio posted about Rooms by the Sea:

Rooms By The Sea by Edward Hopper hangs at the Yale University Art Gallery. I have never seen this painting in person, but a copy of it has hung at my house for years. There is a door opening onto water, a picture on the wall, carpet, a tall set of drawers or maybe a cabinet, and a sofa. And there is light. The only things that are thoroughly representational are the door handle and the strike plate. The strange part is that there are no stairs to the water, it looks like there is a straight drop.

Another way to see the picture is to look at the blocks of color. At the bottom there is an oddly shaped block of avocado green. Above it is a block of very light yellow, a block of off-white (shaded towards black), and above that is a block of gray. As your eyes move around the painting, you see other blocks of colors. Even the sea is mostly flat blue with just hits of white foam. It is a tribute to the human eye that even without knowing the name of the painting, we have no trouble converting those blocks of color into something representational.

Art Threat brought us news about art protest:

Last week giant plastic six-pack rings strangled public sculptures around Vancouver. Initiated by the Plastic Pollution Coalition and developed by Vancouver-based ad agency Rethink, this stunt presented downtown commuters with visual protests against the mass consumption of single-use plastic.

“Nearly every plastic item ever created still exists, and has harmful effects on the environment, wildlife, and humans,” says Manuel Maqueda of the PPC. “Patches of plastic pollution currently cover millions of square miles of ocean in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In the environment, plastic breaks down into smaller and smaller particles that are ingested by wildlife and contaminate our food chain.”

Jake Remington posted a piece called "Bulletproof":

person1597 posted another original:

PIXEL_CRISIS

Looking at the connection between the inner point of view and the outer world of substance, the rationalized Form creates a membrane between the need to know and the limits of perception.

Can we understand our impact on the world? Or does consciousness blind us from some greater awareness? Would that people’s brave minds bear witness to the depths of tension and tumult existentially present.

Alas, the Form creates the dysfunction amidst the market based trade-offs between rules and exogenous conditions. The argument can always be reframed. Fade to eye candy.

And Kelly Canfield had a great operarant:

Ach my dear Operanizzles, it is time again for OperaRant, Number the Third! Behold!

Hear the Overture, if you like, as I preface this tale of Magic and Deceit, as you well know is my craft and trade.

In this Rant we bow to the majesty of the absurd, and the master of Comic Opera: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and "Die Zauberflote," The Magic Flute.

On Food Sunday, Toby Wollin brought us the news:

The sun is up; the sky is blue. My shoulder is purple and green (for those not following every detail of my life, I fell off my bike two Fridays age and dislocated and broke my left shoulder). And here’s the news:

Urban gardening goes up – and big time. 40,000 square foot roof garden grows in Long Island City. “ Rooftop farms have been appearing recently across New York and the nation, but few have the scope of Brooklyn Grange, a for-profit venture started by Ben Flanner, a transplanted Wisconsinite, and the operators of Roberta’s, a popular restaurant that has become something of a farm-to-table clubhouse in Bushwick, Brooklyn. The group plans to sell its vegetables — selected for their ability to thrive in the sunny, windy conditions of an open city roof — from a stand at the farm, and to a few restaurants. “
LIC Roof Farm

Jessica Glasscoe taught us some salad:

A chopped salad is hardly ever inspiring. It can be tasty at times, there’s no doubt, but as far as salads go, it’s sort of a non-salad-eaters salad. It’s barely healthy, and is usually made of limp and processed meats and cheeses, which brings it closer in classification to a hoagie than a salad.

I’ve made a recent resolution to fill my life with salads – new salads, full of ingredients I don’t often eat, like beets, endive, or radicchio – topped with different cheeses, and exciting new dressings. So far, this resolution has been easier to keep than most – spring and summer just beg for quick meals that leave you feeling light and refreshed. I’ve been on a goat cheese bender recently too, so most of my salads end up with a good bit of creamy cheese sprinkled over the top, which makes any salad worth eating.

Bill Egnor had wonderful Fragels:

IMG_0232

Happy Sunday Bread Heads! Back when I was haunting the University of Michigan campus there was a fabulous bagel bakery, called the Bagel Factory. It was located on South University just steps from the big lot where the Mud Bowl was played every year. One of the things that made the Bagel Factory famous was the Fragel. It was a cinnamon raisin bagel that was deep fried then rolled in cinnamon sugar. Fragrant, sweet as all get out and filling it was a Saturday morning tradition for many starving college students.

When I broke out my bagel recipe a few weeks ago I started thinking about Fragels. I had never worked at the Bagel Factory, but really how hard could it be? Well the answer is harder than you think, if you don’t have a recipe to follow. However after six batches with different combination’s I am ready to hand you all the secret of the homemade Fragels.

alanaclaire won her election, and talked a bit more about rhubarb:

Oh, boy. It’s been quite a week. I could add in a couple of expletives, but I’m still on good behavior.

On election day, in between sign holding and pacing around the house and making everyone dinner so that we wouldn’t forget to eat, I sat down for a minute with my mother and brought up that topic that seems to be revisited quite a bit these days.

"Am I totally insane?"

My mother, as mothers do so well, put it in the perspective of the whole time line of all these years. "You do this kind of thing. You always have. You’re really good at keeping it interesting." I guess we all have a talent.

At the end of the night I was at a little bar across from town hall, shakily sipping my vodka tonic.

And twolf1 made sure we knew about American Craft Beer Week:

Tomorrow (Monday, May 17th) marks the beginning of American Craft Beer Week 2010. That means it’s time to support your local craft brewer by drinking lots of their beer.

Click through, check out the art and sample the food, and leave a comment. Then join us next weekend for more Food Sunday and Saturday Art!

In case you missed us this weekend, here’s what we had cooking on Saturday Art and Food Sunday…

On Saturday Art, Mitchell Frye had a photograph from New York:

masaccio posted about Rooms by the Sea:

Rooms By The Sea by Edward Hopper hangs at the Yale University Art Gallery. I have never seen this painting in person, but a copy of it has hung at my house for years. There is a door opening onto water, a picture on the wall, carpet, a tall set of drawers or maybe a cabinet, and a sofa. And there is light. The only things that are thoroughly representational are the door handle and the strike plate. The strange part is that there are no stairs to the water, it looks like there is a straight drop.

Another way to see the picture is to look at the blocks of color. At the bottom there is an oddly shaped block of avocado green. Above it is a block of very light yellow, a block of off-white (shaded towards black), and above that is a block of gray. As your eyes move around the painting, you see other blocks of colors. Even the sea is mostly flat blue with just hits of white foam. It is a tribute to the human eye that even without knowing the name of the painting, we have no trouble converting those blocks of color into something representational.

Art Threat brought us news about art protest:

Last week giant plastic six-pack rings strangled public sculptures around Vancouver. Initiated by the Plastic Pollution Coalition and developed by Vancouver-based ad agency Rethink, this stunt presented downtown commuters with visual protests against the mass consumption of single-use plastic.

“Nearly every plastic item ever created still exists, and has harmful effects on the environment, wildlife, and humans,” says Manuel Maqueda of the PPC. “Patches of plastic pollution currently cover millions of square miles of ocean in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In the environment, plastic breaks down into smaller and smaller particles that are ingested by wildlife and contaminate our food chain.”

Jake Remington posted a piece called "Bulletproof":

person1597 posted another original:

PIXEL_CRISIS

Looking at the connection between the inner point of view and the outer world of substance, the rationalized Form creates a membrane between the need to know and the limits of perception.

Can we understand our impact on the world? Or does consciousness blind us from some greater awareness? Would that people’s brave minds bear witness to the depths of tension and tumult existentially present.

Alas, the Form creates the dysfunction amidst the market based trade-offs between rules and exogenous conditions. The argument can always be reframed. Fade to eye candy.

And Kelly Canfield had a great operarant:

Ach my dear Operanizzles, it is time again for OperaRant, Number the Third! Behold!

Hear the Overture, if you like, as I preface this tale of Magic and Deceit, as you well know is my craft and trade.

In this Rant we bow to the majesty of the absurd, and the master of Comic Opera: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and "Die Zauberflote," The Magic Flute.

On Food Sunday, Toby Wollin brought us the news:

The sun is up; the sky is blue. My shoulder is purple and green (for those not following every detail of my life, I fell off my bike two Fridays age and dislocated and broke my left shoulder). And here’s the news:

Urban gardening goes up – and big time. 40,000 square foot roof garden grows in Long Island City. “ Rooftop farms have been appearing recently across New York and the nation, but few have the scope of Brooklyn Grange, a for-profit venture started by Ben Flanner, a transplanted Wisconsinite, and the operators of Roberta’s, a popular restaurant that has become something of a farm-to-table clubhouse in Bushwick, Brooklyn. The group plans to sell its vegetables — selected for their ability to thrive in the sunny, windy conditions of an open city roof — from a stand at the farm, and to a few restaurants. “
LIC Roof Farm

Jessica Glasscoe taught us some salad:

A chopped salad is hardly ever inspiring. It can be tasty at times, there’s no doubt, but as far as salads go, it’s sort of a non-salad-eaters salad. It’s barely healthy, and is usually made of limp and processed meats and cheeses, which brings it closer in classification to a hoagie than a salad.

I’ve made a recent resolution to fill my life with salads – new salads, full of ingredients I don’t often eat, like beets, endive, or radicchio – topped with different cheeses, and exciting new dressings. So far, this resolution has been easier to keep than most – spring and summer just beg for quick meals that leave you feeling light and refreshed. I’ve been on a goat cheese bender recently too, so most of my salads end up with a good bit of creamy cheese sprinkled over the top, which makes any salad worth eating.

Bill Egnor had wonderful Fragels:

IMG_0232

Happy Sunday Bread Heads! Back when I was haunting the University of Michigan campus there was a fabulous bagel bakery, called the Bagel Factory. It was located on South University just steps from the big lot where the Mud Bowl was played every year. One of the things that made the Bagel Factory famous was the Fragel. It was a cinnamon raisin bagel that was deep fried then rolled in cinnamon sugar. Fragrant, sweet as all get out and filling it was a Saturday morning tradition for many starving college students.

When I broke out my bagel recipe a few weeks ago I started thinking about Fragels. I had never worked at the Bagel Factory, but really how hard could it be? Well the answer is harder than you think, if you don’t have a recipe to follow. However after six batches with different combination’s I am ready to hand you all the secret of the homemade Fragels.

alanaclaire won her election, and talked a bit more about rhubarb:

Oh, boy. It’s been quite a week. I could add in a couple of expletives, but I’m still on good behavior.

On election day, in between sign holding and pacing around the house and making everyone dinner so that we wouldn’t forget to eat, I sat down for a minute with my mother and brought up that topic that seems to be revisited quite a bit these days.

"Am I totally insane?"

My mother, as mothers do so well, put it in the perspective of the whole time line of all these years. "You do this kind of thing. You always have. You’re really good at keeping it interesting." I guess we all have a talent.

At the end of the night I was at a little bar across from town hall, shakily sipping my vodka tonic.

And twolf1 made sure we knew about American Craft Beer Week:

Tomorrow (Monday, May 17th) marks the beginning of American Craft Beer Week 2010. That means it’s time to support your local craft brewer by drinking lots of their beer.

Click through, check out the art and sample the food, and leave a comment. Then join us next weekend for more Food Sunday and Saturday Art!

Jason Rosenbaum

Jason Rosenbaum

Writer, musician, activist. Currently consulting for Bill Halter for U.S. Senate and a fellow at the New Organizing Institute.

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