If you couldn’t join us this weekend for Saturday Art and Food Sunday, here’s what you missed…

Mitchell Frye brought us this photo:

masaccio discussed Michelangelo’s Pieta:

Michelangelo’s Pieta is in Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Mary holds her murdered son in her arms, in the same way she held him as an infant, only this time there will be no comforting, no warm breast to salve infant hunger, no kiss to heal the bruise, no tender word to ease the pain of an insult. And yet she tries: her splayed fingers pull him to her body, as if she could press her own life into his lifeless body. Her face is lost in the heartbreak that is now her share of life.

The Pieta transcends its Christian roots. The memories a Catholic or a Baptist carries in the heart from years of Catechism or Sunday School may reinforce the emotional power of this work, but there is no mother, no father, and indeed no child who doesn’t respond to the sense of loss, the feeling of desperation, and in the end, the quiet acceptance of a diminished existence that Michelangelo put into the world.

Jake Remington brought us "dark":

Art Threat took us to Israel and Palestine:

The Combatants for Peace use non-violent methods, such as Theater of the Oppressed tactics, to promote dialogue and a joint effort to end the occupation of Palestine. Recently this group, Israelis who were once soldiers in the Israeli army (IDF) and Palestinians who were once involved in the militant struggle for freedom, chose the blocked road that ascends to the village Shufa (near Tul Karm, West Bank) as their stage. The scene was a checkpoint within the West Bank. The scenario was a typical daily occurrence: an old, ill Palestinian arrives at a checkpoint (where he presumably needs to cross to seek medical care), and the soldiers have to decide to let him pass or detain and interrogate him to follow standard procedure. However, the roles of the cast were switched: an Israeli played the sick Palestinian man, while Palestinians played the two Israeli soldiers.

And person1597 took us to outer space:

Wormhole_Gallery20100501

On Food Sunday, Toby Wollin had the news:

So, you think we’re making headway on High Fructose Corn Syrup? Worthy article from the NYT on what’s happening to processed foods in the US now that more consumers are concerned about HFCS. The takeaway: down 9% since 2007; unfortunately, Mexican manufacturers are using it a lot more. Sales there at up 50%. HFCS

California’s hunger problems could be solved, if only they wouldn’t waste so much food: “State studies have found that more than six million tons of food products are dumped annually, enough to fill the Staples Center in Los Angeles 35 times over. Food is the largest single source of waste in California, making up 15.5 percent of the Golden State’s waste stream, according to the California Integrated Waste Management Board. “ Food Waste

Bill Egnor taught us how to make scones:

IMG_0188

Happy Sunday Dread Heads! This week we’re starting to work our way through the gift basket for Jesse William’s parents (just a side note, you put my name (Bill) on one of your kids, you get a much more decadent bakery basket, just saying). Scones are the order of the day, two types, Cinnamon and Chocolate Chip.

Scones in their basic form are really just Scottish biscuits. Since I like a strong difference between sweet bread and non-sweet bread and I have the perfect recipe for biscuits, I only make sweet scones. The Cinnamon scones are less sweet since than the Chocolate Chip ones, as they just have a glaze on the top. You can also skip the glaze on the Chocolate Chip scones, if you want, but I think you would be making a big mistake.

alanaclaire discussed food and her local politics:

I will be entirely honest with you. In this week before the local election in my little town, I am so happy to close my mouth for a few minutes and to write in silence.  My voice is needing a break.  I have been spending these days answering question after question. In a small town like this one, after your face is on the front of the local paper, the sidewalk is full of questions. The little market where I go to find my harder-to-find ingredients is full of questions. The liquor store where I stop to get my husband some beer as an appreciation for practically single parenting lately- more questions.

Really, I am happy for the questions. I want to talk to people, and mostly I want to ask them questions of my own. I want to know what they think about what is going on around here.

Jessica Glasscoe had stuffed peppers:

When I was a freshman in college, I subsisted solely upon Grape-Nuts, Veggie Burgers, Grilled Cheese and Tater Tots. Oh, what a happy day Grilled Cheese Day was! I had friends that would eat 5 or 6 at a time! Occasionally, the cafeteria gods would smile upon us suffering underclassmen, and they would proclaim that we should be served something different….something healthy, but tasty….and they would serve us Stuffed Peppers. In Kittridge Hall, they would stuff green peppers with couscous and vegetables…they were a little boring, so I’d always top them with whatever soup or pasta sauce was offered that day. Dorm room living wasn’t glamorous, but it sure was easy, wasn’t it?

I would hardly say that stuffed peppers were ever a favorite of mine, but in the dredges of a freshman diet, they create an excitement that is surpassed only by a meal eaten OUTSIDE the dorms. This is no shining introduction to our recent dinner of Stuffed Peppers with Spicy Collards and Scallion Pilaf, but it is the truth. Stuffed Peppers have a pretty homely reputation, and it is for good reason. Vegetarian versions still carry with them that 70’s veggie vibe that scares most people away from "vegetarian" eating. BUT, if something is good, and it happens to be meat free, then most people will gladly forget their carnivorous ways.

And demi dove into shrimp:

Bad news for everyone. I think a lot of people didn’t want to worry their beautiful little minds when Dick Cheney and Halliburton made decisions about deregulating the oil companies in secret back room meetings. They might have preferred to worry about the problems that affected them on a day to day basis. Like, do I really need to worry about whether the nanny and housekeepers and gardeners have a Green Card.

Like everyone else, this family has been following the horrific BP disaster in the Gulf. Yesterday morning, my husband said to me Well, I guess it’s a good thing we enjoyed our shrimp and lobster at our Easter Camping trip, ’cause there’s going to be a seriously limited supply of those food items at the grocery store in the near future. That was snark on his part, of course. I told him, well, there’ll always be lobster from Maine. That was snark on my part too.

Click the links, leave a comment, and join us next weekend for more food and art!

If you couldn’t join us this weekend for Saturday Art and Food Sunday, here’s what you missed…

Mitchell Frye brought us this photo:

masaccio discussed Michelangelo’s Pieta:

Michelangelo’s Pieta is in Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Mary holds her murdered son in her arms, in the same way she held him as an infant, only this time there will be no comforting, no warm breast to salve infant hunger, no kiss to heal the bruise, no tender word to ease the pain of an insult. And yet she tries: her splayed fingers pull him to her body, as if she could press her own life into his lifeless body. Her face is lost in the heartbreak that is now her share of life.

The Pieta transcends its Christian roots. The memories a Catholic or a Baptist carries in the heart from years of Catechism or Sunday School may reinforce the emotional power of this work, but there is no mother, no father, and indeed no child who doesn’t respond to the sense of loss, the feeling of desperation, and in the end, the quiet acceptance of a diminished existence that Michelangelo put into the world.

Jake Remington brought us "dark":

Art Threat took us to Israel and Palestine:

The Combatants for Peace use non-violent methods, such as Theater of the Oppressed tactics, to promote dialogue and a joint effort to end the occupation of Palestine. Recently this group, Israelis who were once soldiers in the Israeli army (IDF) and Palestinians who were once involved in the militant struggle for freedom, chose the blocked road that ascends to the village Shufa (near Tul Karm, West Bank) as their stage. The scene was a checkpoint within the West Bank. The scenario was a typical daily occurrence: an old, ill Palestinian arrives at a checkpoint (where he presumably needs to cross to seek medical care), and the soldiers have to decide to let him pass or detain and interrogate him to follow standard procedure. However, the roles of the cast were switched: an Israeli played the sick Palestinian man, while Palestinians played the two Israeli soldiers.

And person1597 took us to outer space:

Wormhole_Gallery20100501

On Food Sunday, Toby Wollin had the news:

So, you think we’re making headway on High Fructose Corn Syrup? Worthy article from the NYT on what’s happening to processed foods in the US now that more consumers are concerned about HFCS. The takeaway: down 9% since 2007; unfortunately, Mexican manufacturers are using it a lot more. Sales there at up 50%. HFCS

California’s hunger problems could be solved, if only they wouldn’t waste so much food: “State studies have found that more than six million tons of food products are dumped annually, enough to fill the Staples Center in Los Angeles 35 times over. Food is the largest single source of waste in California, making up 15.5 percent of the Golden State’s waste stream, according to the California Integrated Waste Management Board. “ Food Waste

Bill Egnor taught us how to make scones:

IMG_0188

Happy Sunday Dread Heads! This week we’re starting to work our way through the gift basket for Jesse William’s parents (just a side note, you put my name (Bill) on one of your kids, you get a much more decadent bakery basket, just saying). Scones are the order of the day, two types, Cinnamon and Chocolate Chip.

Scones in their basic form are really just Scottish biscuits. Since I like a strong difference between sweet bread and non-sweet bread and I have the perfect recipe for biscuits, I only make sweet scones. The Cinnamon scones are less sweet since than the Chocolate Chip ones, as they just have a glaze on the top. You can also skip the glaze on the Chocolate Chip scones, if you want, but I think you would be making a big mistake.

alanaclaire discussed food and her local politics:

I will be entirely honest with you. In this week before the local election in my little town, I am so happy to close my mouth for a few minutes and to write in silence.  My voice is needing a break.  I have been spending these days answering question after question. In a small town like this one, after your face is on the front of the local paper, the sidewalk is full of questions. The little market where I go to find my harder-to-find ingredients is full of questions. The liquor store where I stop to get my husband some beer as an appreciation for practically single parenting lately- more questions.

Really, I am happy for the questions. I want to talk to people, and mostly I want to ask them questions of my own. I want to know what they think about what is going on around here.

Jessica Glasscoe had stuffed peppers:

When I was a freshman in college, I subsisted solely upon Grape-Nuts, Veggie Burgers, Grilled Cheese and Tater Tots. Oh, what a happy day Grilled Cheese Day was! I had friends that would eat 5 or 6 at a time! Occasionally, the cafeteria gods would smile upon us suffering underclassmen, and they would proclaim that we should be served something different….something healthy, but tasty….and they would serve us Stuffed Peppers. In Kittridge Hall, they would stuff green peppers with couscous and vegetables…they were a little boring, so I’d always top them with whatever soup or pasta sauce was offered that day. Dorm room living wasn’t glamorous, but it sure was easy, wasn’t it?

I would hardly say that stuffed peppers were ever a favorite of mine, but in the dredges of a freshman diet, they create an excitement that is surpassed only by a meal eaten OUTSIDE the dorms. This is no shining introduction to our recent dinner of Stuffed Peppers with Spicy Collards and Scallion Pilaf, but it is the truth. Stuffed Peppers have a pretty homely reputation, and it is for good reason. Vegetarian versions still carry with them that 70’s veggie vibe that scares most people away from "vegetarian" eating. BUT, if something is good, and it happens to be meat free, then most people will gladly forget their carnivorous ways.

And demi dove into shrimp:

Bad news for everyone. I think a lot of people didn’t want to worry their beautiful little minds when Dick Cheney and Halliburton made decisions about deregulating the oil companies in secret back room meetings. They might have preferred to worry about the problems that affected them on a day to day basis. Like, do I really need to worry about whether the nanny and housekeepers and gardeners have a Green Card.

Like everyone else, this family has been following the horrific BP disaster in the Gulf. Yesterday morning, my husband said to me Well, I guess it’s a good thing we enjoyed our shrimp and lobster at our Easter Camping trip, ’cause there’s going to be a seriously limited supply of those food items at the grocery store in the near future. That was snark on his part, of course. I told him, well, there’ll always be lobster from Maine. That was snark on my part too.

Click the links, leave a comment, and join us next weekend for more food and art!

Jason Rosenbaum

Jason Rosenbaum

Writer, musician, activist. Currently consulting for Bill Halter for U.S. Senate and a fellow at the New Organizing Institute.

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