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You want to see a demonstration? They’ll show you a demonstration

Over the last year or so we’ve been treated/subjected to Tea Party rally coverage. Those ‘tight-camera shots’ have allowed their organizers to claim hundreds of thousands were in attendance, nay MILLIONS! when reality showed a few thousand.

But that doesn’t stop the media from treating them like a huge social movement.

Coverage bias was most pronounced during the Health Care Reform votes when several hundred teabaggers on the Capitol grounds got a great deal of coverage, while a pro-immigration reform march at the same time drew a much bigger crowd, well into the tens of thousands, received virtually none.

So let the teabags steep in their inflated numbers, thanks to Arizona, on very short notice, now you’ll see what a real political protest looks like.

Protest organizers said on Wednesday outrage over the Arizona law — which seeks to drive illegal immigrants out of the state bordering Mexico — has galvanized Latinos and would translate into a higher turnout for May Day rallies in more than 70 U.S. cities.

Some of these rallies, like Los Angeles alone in 2006 may (just may, remember short notice) draw half-a-million. Suck.on.that. Arizona.

Not that you’ll see much coverage. After all, some mid-50ish white woman from Knoxville is screaming and carrying a sign telling the federal government to stay out of her “soshal securitee” and demanding those socialists let her drink liquor when she’s carrying her handgun. And that’s damn-fine television.

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Attaturk

Attaturk

In 1949, I decided to wrestle professionally, starting my career in Texas. In my debut, I defeated Abe Kashey, with former World Heavyweight boxing Champion Jack Dempsey as the referee. In 1950, I captured the NWA Junior Heavyweight title. In 1953, I won the Chicago version of the NWA United States Championship. I became one of the most well-known stars in wrestling during the golden age of television, thanks to my exposure on the Dumont Network, where I wowed audiences with my technical prowess. I was rumored to be one of the highest paid wrestlers during the 1950s, reportedly earning a hundred thousand dollars a year. My specialty was "the Sleeper Hold" and the founding of modern, secular, Turkey.

Oops, sorry, that's the biography of Verne Gagne with a touch of Mustafa Kemal.

I'm just an average moron who in reality is a practicing civil rights and employment attorney in fly-over country .

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