Chez Mouquin hangs at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was painted at a restaurant known as the Mouquin Uptown in New York City in 1905. According to a scion of the Mouquin family, Glackens got the wife of the owner, Jeanne Louise Mouquin, to sit, along with another restaurant owner, James B. Moore who resembled Jeanne’s husband Henri Mouquin. There is some outstanding gossip about the Mouquins at this site. The restaurant resembles a typical upscale Paris restaurant, like Brasserie Lipp.

The woman is bored. She and her partner are looking to our left, perhaps at someone coming or going, but they aren’t that interested. Both are drinking liquor, which was a bit of a scandal according to the wall plaque at the Art Institute. Both are well-dressed, which puts us at the heart of the matter: I like fashion. I read the Fug Girls regularly and vote often.

I also love Project Runway. I started watching three years ago, as Chris March and Christian Siriano fought it out. Take a look at the jewel colors of Chris March, and the impeccable tailoring and sophisticated showmanship of Christian Siriano. Sweet P was good, in fact, Jezebel loved her, but to me, she wasn’t playing in the same league as her competitors.

I was totally taken by the Goddess Heidi Klum, the sharp eye and tongue of Nina Garcia, the slightly louche Michael Kors, and the shepherd Tim Gunn.

Portraits are about people, but also about clothes. I’m sure that Jeanne Mouquin’s dress would not pass muster with Heidi, who pointedly explained to Jay that no woman wants to call attention to her hips. But 1905 was the era of the bustle balanced by the giant hat, and this is a classic example. And take a look at the first piece in Christian Siriano’s collection, the hat counterbalancing the hippy skirt.

This year designers got a chance to design their own prints. Emilio won, but Maya’s fabric was the clear winner. And for what it’s worth, I liked Jonathan’s idea, if not the precise shades of the fabrics, more than Maya’s.

Glackens’ clothes are not rendered with the loving eye of a Florentine painter ignoring the Sumptuary Laws of Florence to please his patron, as in this portrait of Eleanora of Toledo by Bronzino. Nor do we see the sharp attention paid to the pleasures of cloth by the French painter Hyacinthe Rigaud in this portrait of the Sun King. Note the red heel, you Christian Louboutin fans.

But I love Glackens’ fabrics and this combination of lace at the neckline, closed with a large black pearl and the decorative features on the dress, particularly at the bottom. This wouldn’t mean anything to Seth Aaron, whose collection was wonderful, and no one, even the professional commenter Tim Gunn, could even make a suggestion to Emilio, but Mila maybe should have used some of this color palate in her collection.

Chez Mouquin hangs at the Art Institute of Chicago. It was painted at a restaurant known as the Mouquin Uptown in New York City in 1905. According to a scion of the Mouquin family, Glackens got the wife of the owner, Jeanne Louise Mouquin, to sit, along with another restaurant owner, James B. Moore who resembled Jeanne’s husband Henri Mouquin. There is some outstanding gossip about the Mouquins at this site. The restaurant resembles a typical upscale Paris restaurant, like Brasserie Lipp.

The woman is bored. She and her partner are looking to our left, perhaps at someone coming or going, but they aren’t that interested. Both are drinking liquor, which was a bit of a scandal according to the wall plaque at the Art Institute. Both are well-dressed, which puts us at the heart of the matter: I like fashion. I read the Fug Girls regularly and vote often.

I also love Project Runway. I started watching three years ago, as Chris March and Christian Siriano fought it out. Take a look at the jewel colors of Chris March, and the impeccable tailoring and sophisticated showmanship of Christian Siriano. Sweet P was good, in fact, Jezebel loved her, but to me, she wasn’t playing in the same league as her competitors.

I was totally taken by the Goddess Heidi Klum, the sharp eye and tongue of Nina Garcia, the slightly louche Michael Kors, and the shepherd Tim Gunn.

Portraits are about people, but also about clothes. I’m sure that Jeanne Mouquin’s dress would not pass muster with Heidi, who pointedly explained to Jay that no woman wants to call attention to her hips. But 1905 was the era of the bustle balanced by the giant hat, and this is a classic example. And take a look at the first piece in Christian Siriano’s collection, the hat counterbalancing the hippy skirt.

This year designers got a chance to design their own prints. Emilio won, but Maya’s fabric was the clear winner. And for what it’s worth, I liked Jonathan’s idea, if not the precise shades of the fabrics, more than Maya’s.

Glackens’ clothes are not rendered with the loving eye of a Florentine painter ignoring the Sumptuary Laws of Florence to please his patron, as in this portrait of Eleanora of Toledo by Bronzino. Nor do we see the sharp attention paid to the pleasures of cloth by the French painter Hyacinthe Rigaud in this portrait of the Sun King. Note the red heel, you Christian Louboutin fans.

But I love Glackens’ fabrics and this combination of lace at the neckline, closed with a large black pearl and the decorative features on the dress, particularly at the bottom. This wouldn’t mean anything to Seth Aaron, whose collection was wonderful, and no one, even the professional commenter Tim Gunn, could even make a suggestion to Emilio, but Mila maybe should have used some of this color palate in her collection.

masaccio

masaccio

I read a lot of books.

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