Public relations firm Murray Hill, which has a history of representing unions, environmental groups and other progressive organizations, has decided to take the US Supreme Court's recent ruling on corporate personhood to the next logical (sic) level: the firm has announced that it's corporate self is running for Congress. From their web site:

“Until now,” Murray Hill Inc. said in a statement, “corporate interests had to rely on campaign contributions and influence peddling to achieve their goals in Washington. But thanks to an enlightened Supreme Court, now we can eliminate the middle-man and run for office ourselves.”

Murray Hill Inc. is believed to be the first “corporate person” to exercise its constitutional right to run for office. As Supreme Court observer Lyle Denniston wrote in his SCOTUSblog, “If anything, the decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission conferred new dignity on corporate “persons,” treating them – under the First Amendment free-speech clause – as the equal of human beings.”

Murray Hill Inc. agrees. “The strength of America,” Murray Hill Inc. says, “is in the boardrooms, country clubs and Lear jets of America’s great corporations. We’re saying to Wal-Mart, AIG and Pfizer, if not you, who? If not now, when?”

More, with their first campaign commercial below the fold.

More from the company’s statement:

Murray Hill Inc. plans on filing to run in the Republican primary in Maryland’s 8th Congressional District. Campaign Manager William Klein promises an aggressive, historic campaign that “puts people second” or even third.

“The business of America is business, as we all know,” Klein says. “But now, it’s the business of democracy too.” Klein plans to use automated robo-calls, “Astroturf” lobbying and computer-generated avatars to get out the vote.

Salon article here

As the sponsor of Washington’s Initiative 957, I wholeheartedly endorse political street theater as a tool of ridiculing illogical court opinions. If you have a Facebook account, please become a fan here

Gregory Gadow

Gregory Gadow

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