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What you missed on Food Sunday

If you couldn’t join us yesterday for Food Sunday, here’s what you missed. First, the recipes…

Toby Wollin enlightened us to the ins and outs of quinoa:

quinoaAs usual, Aunt Toby is going to take care of the housekeeping chores first:

Quinoa is pronounced “keen-wa”. It is NOT pronounced  ‘kwin-o-a”.

Quinoa is not a grain. It is not a member of the grass family (bet you didn’t know that fact is the spot where the grain rubber meets the road). It is a member of the chenopodium plant family, which includes such nutritional superstars as Swiss chard, beets, and spinach. Although the leaves are edible, it is grown for its seeds. One note: because it is not a member of the grass family, it has no gluten – it is also not processed like grain products are, so it will not have picked up gluten during processing (one of the problems with oats is that in their natural state, they don’t have gluten in them but they do pick it up because they are handled and processed many times through the same equipment that other grains are).

Jessica Glasscoe had a guilty pleasure, Ginger Pear Upside-Down Cake:

Yes, I’ve been known to sneak all the cherries out of the fruit bowl, and I’ve been caught more than once stealing extra frosting off the cake to put on my slice. I’ve even developed a reputation with my mother-in-law as that elicits warnings whenever one of her poundcakes and yours truly find themselves in the same room together… I will shamelessly cut just the crust off the poundcake, and leave that naked wobbly slice there in cold to fend for itself. I am guilty as charged of non-egalitarian eating. Forget the notion of building up to the climax, or saving the best for last, or even the idea that you don’t deserve the frosting unless you eat the cake with it.

And alanaclaire taught us how to make ricotta cheese, and then turn it into chocolate mousse:

How about a little home cheese making today?

No! Come back! I promise, you’re going to like this one.

Yes, I admit, making cheese at home can be a daunting process, even for the seasoned homesteader. There are cultures to send away for, there is complex alchemy to oversee and there is waiting, waiting, waiting.

But not so with ricotta. A pitcher of milk, a lemon or two, a candy thermometer and a length of cheesecloth is all you will need. You will finally have the satisfaction of using cheesecloth for cheese! And in an hour or so of checking in on the pot every so often, tiring your arm with no more than ten stirs of the spoon, you can call yourself a cheese maker. And after you make your ricotta, you will be ten minutes away from one of the easiest and most fabulous desserts that you can make in ten minutes.

I’ve got you now, right?

Jill Richardson discussed climate change and food policy, a crucial connection:

Looking at the big picture in Copenhagen, we’re already at 390 ppm CO2 in the atmosphere and we need to be at 350 ppm. The deal the U.S. was proposing would put us at 550 ppm. Likewise, we’re already at a 0.7 degree Celsius global temperature increase, and the deal (which is non-binding) calls for a 2 degree increase. African nations call that a death sentence, as 2 degrees globally equates to 3.5 degrees in Africa. They ask for "1.5 to stay alive." Yet, if each nation reduces emissions by what they pledged, we’re looking at a 3 degree increase. Weak.

So what about agriculture? I’ve posted draft language for the agriculture agreement on my blog. It seems that none of this was included in the final text of the agreement. But it certainly shows the direction international negotiations are going on ag. And I fear they are going down the wrong road.

And demi asked everyone to find links that make them laugh:

Last week, I wrote about cookies equaling love.

Today, I want to post an opportunity for folks to take a break from the screaming meanies and share a little laughter.

I was on a thread the other day and made a funny and someone (please forgive for forgetting who) wrote, Well, we need a little good humor around here. Got me to thinking.

I believe we pups have signature profiles. Can you think of Marion in Savannah without smelling maple syrup and pancakes? Can you think of Elliot without having visions of Sunday Morning talking heads dancing in your head? I can’t think about eCAHN without imagining Wall St. Mooses.

I like to say Ha! And, why is that? Because A Spoon Full Of Sugar Helps The Medicine Go Down. And Laughter Is The Best Medicine.

Head over to the post and check out the items in the comments.

Thanks to all who joined us for Food Sunday. If you missed it, click through and leave a comment. And stop by next week for our next edition.

CommunitySeminal

What you missed on Food Sunday

If you couldn’t join us yesterday for Food Sunday, here’s what you missed. First, the recipes…

Toby Wollin enlightened us to the ins and outs of quinoa:

quinoaAs usual, Aunt Toby is going to take care of the housekeeping chores first:

Quinoa is pronounced “keen-wa”. It is NOT pronounced  ‘kwin-o-a”.

Quinoa is not a grain. It is not a member of the grass family (bet you didn’t know that fact is the spot where the grain rubber meets the road). It is a member of the chenopodium plant family, which includes such nutritional superstars as Swiss chard, beets, and spinach. Although the leaves are edible, it is grown for its seeds. One note: because it is not a member of the grass family, it has no gluten – it is also not processed like grain products are, so it will not have picked up gluten during processing (one of the problems with oats is that in their natural state, they don’t have gluten in them but they do pick it up because they are handled and processed many times through the same equipment that other grains are).

Jessica Glasscoe had a guilty pleasure, Ginger Pear Upside-Down Cake:

Yes, I’ve been known to sneak all the cherries out of the fruit bowl, and I’ve been caught more than once stealing extra frosting off the cake to put on my slice. I’ve even developed a reputation with my mother-in-law as that elicits warnings whenever one of her poundcakes and yours truly find themselves in the same room together… I will shamelessly cut just the crust off the poundcake, and leave that naked wobbly slice there in cold to fend for itself. I am guilty as charged of non-egalitarian eating. Forget the notion of building up to the climax, or saving the best for last, or even the idea that you don’t deserve the frosting unless you eat the cake with it.

And alanaclaire taught us how to make ricotta cheese, and then turn it into chocolate mousse:

How about a little home cheese making today?

No! Come back! I promise, you’re going to like this one.

Yes, I admit, making cheese at home can be a daunting process, even for the seasoned homesteader. There are cultures to send away for, there is complex alchemy to oversee and there is waiting, waiting, waiting.

But not so with ricotta. A pitcher of milk, a lemon or two, a candy thermometer and a length of cheesecloth is all you will need. You will finally have the satisfaction of using cheesecloth for cheese! And in an hour or so of checking in on the pot every so often, tiring your arm with no more than ten stirs of the spoon, you can call yourself a cheese maker. And after you make your ricotta, you will be ten minutes away from one of the easiest and most fabulous desserts that you can make in ten minutes.

I’ve got you now, right?

Jill Richardson discussed climate change and food policy, a crucial connection:

Looking at the big picture in Copenhagen, we’re already at 390 ppm CO2 in the atmosphere and we need to be at 350 ppm. The deal the U.S. was proposing would put us at 550 ppm. Likewise, we’re already at a 0.7 degree Celsius global temperature increase, and the deal (which is non-binding) calls for a 2 degree increase. African nations call that a death sentence, as 2 degrees globally equates to 3.5 degrees in Africa. They ask for "1.5 to stay alive." Yet, if each nation reduces emissions by what they pledged, we’re looking at a 3 degree increase. Weak.

So what about agriculture? I’ve posted draft language for the agriculture agreement on my blog. It seems that none of this was included in the final text of the agreement. But it certainly shows the direction international negotiations are going on ag. And I fear they are going down the wrong road.

And demi asked everyone to find links that make them laugh:

Last week, I wrote about cookies equaling love.

Today, I want to post an opportunity for folks to take a break from the screaming meanies and share a little laughter.

I was on a thread the other day and made a funny and someone (please forgive for forgetting who) wrote, Well, we need a little good humor around here. Got me to thinking.

I believe we pups have signature profiles. Can you think of Marion in Savannah without smelling maple syrup and pancakes? Can you think of Elliot without having visions of Sunday Morning talking heads dancing in your head? I can’t think about eCAHN without imagining Wall St. Mooses.

I like to say Ha! And, why is that? Because A Spoon Full Of Sugar Helps The Medicine Go Down. And Laughter Is The Best Medicine.

Head over to the post and check out the items in the comments.

Thanks to all who joined us for Food Sunday. If you missed it, click through and leave a comment. And stop by next week for our next edition.

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Jason Rosenbaum

Jason Rosenbaum

Writer, musician, activist. Currently consulting for Bill Halter for U.S. Senate and a fellow at the New Organizing Institute.