In case you couldn’t join us yesterday for Food Sunday, here’s what you missed…

Jill Richardson gave us a look at the school lunch program and what can be done about it:

With the epidemic rise in diet-related chronic illnesses in the past few decades, many are looking to school lunch as a way to nourish children while simultaneously teaching them healthy dietary habits. It makes perfect sense, right? In fact, why would we choose to serve children anything BUT healthy food for school breakfasts and lunches? Healthy food costs more than junk food, but it’s money well spent because it’s an investment.

And borderjumpers brought us a piece on the World Vegetable Center, empowering local farmers:

The World Vegetable Center is focusing on “building a sustainable seed system in sub-Saharan Africa.” What does that mean? According to Dr. Abdou Tenkouano, Director of the Regional Center for Africa, it requires “bringing farmers voices into the choices of materials they are using.”

The Center does this not only by breeding a variety of vegetables with different traits—including resistance to disease and longer shelf life—but also by bringing farmers from all over eastern, western, and southern Africa to the Regional Center in Arusha, Tanzania, to find out what exactly those farmers need in the field and at market. Mr. Babel Isack, a tomato farmer from Tanzania, was at the Center when I visited, advising staff about which tomato varieties would be best suited for his particular needs—including varieties that depend on fewer chemical sprays and have a longer shelf life.

Now, on to the recipes. First, we had a special guest, filmmaker Ana Joanes, who brought us a pair of recipes for adults and babies:

My little girl, Maayan, is almost 4 months old and ready to be introduced to the world of flavors beyond milk. I’ve been thinking a lot about ways to cook delicious but simple and easy recipes (while handling a baby!) using the same set of ingredients for her and for us. In the spirit of the holidays, I thought I would share these two squash recipes, which mark the beginning of our shared meals. Both recipes use fresh, local ingredients available this time of the year.

Toby Wollin had information about tubers, a lot of which you might not know:

tubers1Now that Thanksgiving is behind us and we’re looking ahead to the rest of the holiday season, Aunt Toby would like to take this moment to do a little bit more pumping for the vegetable end of things. I think veggies are vastly under-rated in terms of what nutrition we can squeeze out of them — especially root veggies, and now it’s time for an All-Star Tuber Nutritional Smack-down!

Tubers have gotten a horrible reputation, thanks to the low-carb movement (and for those of you out there who have figured out what carbs are driving your digestive tract bonkers, bless you..and it’s time to move on). But ‘stuff grown under the ground has a lot to recommend it. Tubers are high in carbohydrates, no doubt about it, but they are also very high in vitamins and minerals that are also very good for us and are more ‘nutritionally dense’ in general than veggies that are grown above the ground. So, let’s not throw the veggie out with the bathwater..or whatever.

OK..so as they used to say on ‘Carmen Sandiego’ – “To the Map!!!” Today’s Smack Down Candidates: White Potatoes (aka Irish Potatoes), Sweet Potatoes, and Jerusalem Artichokes

Jessica Glasscoe had a recipe for Moroccan Braised Chicken:

I’ve become a huge fan of chicken legs lately. They aren’t dry and boring like some poultry cuts I know (ehem, chicken breast), they are cheap enough to justify spending those dollars you save elsewhere (like the wine aisle). They make for a handsome presentation, and they work wonderfully in braises.

Braising is something I’ve been doing a lot lately; maybe because of the change in seasons, or my new book on braising, or maybe just because it works so beautifully, and is so easy.

And alanaclaire had a recipe for peppery pasta carbonara with poached egg:

DSC_0050

In the interest of your own sanity, I’m going to say that you should only keep reading this if you have bacon in the house, or if you are willing to go to the store right now. Perhaps you have even just bought half a happily raised pig from your mechanic, like I have, and then you are all set.

If you don’t have bacon in the house, you might just feel sad that you can’t make this immediately. You might feel hungry and wistful, and I just can’t take thinking of you that way. So don’t read any more. Check back in next week- I’ll have some sort of bacon free recipe for you.

Okay. Whoever is still with me, you’ve got some bacon, right?

Let’s move on, then. This is peppery pasta carbonara with poached egg, or in other words, spaghetti with bacon, cheese and egg all cooked in bacon fat and butter.

Yes. I know.

Click through, get your recipes, leave us a comment, and enjoy!

In case you couldn’t join us yesterday for Food Sunday, here’s what you missed…

Jill Richardson gave us a look at the school lunch program and what can be done about it:

With the epidemic rise in diet-related chronic illnesses in the past few decades, many are looking to school lunch as a way to nourish children while simultaneously teaching them healthy dietary habits. It makes perfect sense, right? In fact, why would we choose to serve children anything BUT healthy food for school breakfasts and lunches? Healthy food costs more than junk food, but it’s money well spent because it’s an investment.

And borderjumpers brought us a piece on the World Vegetable Center, empowering local farmers:

The World Vegetable Center is focusing on “building a sustainable seed system in sub-Saharan Africa.” What does that mean? According to Dr. Abdou Tenkouano, Director of the Regional Center for Africa, it requires “bringing farmers voices into the choices of materials they are using.”

The Center does this not only by breeding a variety of vegetables with different traits—including resistance to disease and longer shelf life—but also by bringing farmers from all over eastern, western, and southern Africa to the Regional Center in Arusha, Tanzania, to find out what exactly those farmers need in the field and at market. Mr. Babel Isack, a tomato farmer from Tanzania, was at the Center when I visited, advising staff about which tomato varieties would be best suited for his particular needs—including varieties that depend on fewer chemical sprays and have a longer shelf life.

Now, on to the recipes. First, we had a special guest, filmmaker Ana Joanes, who brought us a pair of recipes for adults and babies:

My little girl, Maayan, is almost 4 months old and ready to be introduced to the world of flavors beyond milk. I’ve been thinking a lot about ways to cook delicious but simple and easy recipes (while handling a baby!) using the same set of ingredients for her and for us. In the spirit of the holidays, I thought I would share these two squash recipes, which mark the beginning of our shared meals. Both recipes use fresh, local ingredients available this time of the year.

(more…)

Jason Rosenbaum

Jason Rosenbaum

Writer, musician, activist. Currently consulting for Bill Halter for U.S. Senate and a fellow at the New Organizing Institute.

3 Comments