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Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is a busy month. Baseball play-offs. NFL season in full swing. College football has reached the conference parts of the schedules. Professional hockey and basketball seasons start.

But there are two big “awareness” issues in October. National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Domestic Violence Awareness Month. If you can, take a few seconds each day this month and please visit The Breast Cancer Site and click the button to help provide mammograms. (The Breast Cancer Site is a companion to The Hunger Site and others). In this way you can do some small levels of helping others.

This diary however, is about Domestic Violence. I’m not sure when and how this issue first entered my consciousness but it has been there for some years. I think it may have been when I watched a TV movie, The Tracy Thurman Story, about a woman in Torrington, CT who had been seriously injured when attacked by her ex-husband and sued the town of Torrington and the police department for their failures in protecting her, even though she had the restraining orders.

Today’s Hartford Courant has an in-depth article on how the various courts in Connecticut handle Domestic Violence.

Despite an increasing family violence caseload statewide, there remains a wide disparity in the way state courts handle these cases, from pushing defendants to go through intense programs under the threat of jail to going little beyond the standard prosecution.

The Tracey Thurman Law of 1986 made arrests mandatory in domestic violence cases, but the landmark legislation didn’t mandate the way courts should handle the resulting cases. Today, while strides have been made with special family violence dockets in nine of the 20 lower-level courthouses, there is little uniformity in approaches and outcomes.

Today’s Louisville Courier-Journal took a different tack by highlighting:

Teetering in heels, Sgt. Bryan Byrne of the Harrison County Sheriff’s Department made his way along the new Indian Creek Trail at the Harrison County YMCA for Saturday’s “Going the Distance to Prevent Domestic Violence” walk.

“It was painful,” he said. “I have a whole new respect (for women).”

The inaugural walk was sponsored by the Harrison County Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Coordinating Council and the YMCA, in conjunction with their annual Limeberry Lumberjack Run. Sixteen men and boys donned shiny red or hot pink pumps to raise awareness of domestic violence.

Why should Domestic Violence be a concern to all of us? Because we are supposed to be caring humans should be an easy answer but in case it is not enough, studies have been able to connect Domestic Violence to Child Abuse. Both are part of a seemingly never-ending cycle of violence.

As Attaturk, thebagofhealthandpolitics, and others around the web have pointed out as well, in at least eight states, domestic violence victims are considered to have a “pre-existing condition” for insurance purposes. Combined with the thinking that pregnancy is a pre-existing condition, it does appear that Watertiger was correct in her belief that being a woman is a pre-existing condition for the insurance moguls.

We really should be better than all of this leads me to believe we are as a society. Shouldn’t we?

And because I can:

CommunityMy FDLSeminal

Domestic Violence Awareness Month

October is a busy month. Baseball play-offs. NFL season in full swing. College football has reached the conference parts of the schedules. Professional hockey and basketball seasons start.

But there are two big “awareness” issues in October. National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Domestic Violence Awareness Month. If you can, take a few seconds each day this month and please visit The Breast Cancer Site and click the button to help provide mammograms. (The Breast Cancer Site is a companion to The Hunger Site and others). In this way you can do some small levels of helping others.

This diary however, is about Domestic Violence. I’m not sure when and how this issue first entered my consciousness but it has been there for some years. I think it may have been when I watched a TV movie, The Tracy Thurman Story, about a woman in Torrington, CT who had been seriously injured when attacked by her ex-husband and sued the town of Torrington and the police department for their failures in protecting her, even though she had the restraining orders.

Today’s Hartford Courant has an in-depth article on how the various courts in Connecticut handle Domestic Violence.

Despite an increasing family violence caseload statewide, there remains a wide disparity in the way state courts handle these cases, from pushing defendants to go through intense programs under the threat of jail to going little beyond the standard prosecution.

The Tracey Thurman Law of 1986 made arrests mandatory in domestic violence cases, but the landmark legislation didn’t mandate the way courts should handle the resulting cases. Today, while strides have been made with special family violence dockets in nine of the 20 lower-level courthouses, there is little uniformity in approaches and outcomes.

Today’s Louisville Courier-Journal took a different tack by highlighting:

Teetering in heels, Sgt. Bryan Byrne of the Harrison County Sheriff’s Department made his way along the new Indian Creek Trail at the Harrison County YMCA for Saturday’s “Going the Distance to Prevent Domestic Violence” walk.

“It was painful,” he said. “I have a whole new respect (for women).”

The inaugural walk was sponsored by the Harrison County Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Coordinating Council and the YMCA, in conjunction with their annual Limeberry Lumberjack Run. Sixteen men and boys donned shiny red or hot pink pumps to raise awareness of domestic violence.

Why should Domestic Violence be a concern to all of us? Because we are supposed to be caring humans should be an easy answer but in case it is not enough, studies have been able to connect Domestic Violence to Child Abuse. Both are part of a seemingly never-ending cycle of violence.

As Attaturk, thebagofhealthandpolitics, and others around the web have pointed out as well, in at least eight states, domestic violence victims are considered to have a “pre-existing condition” for insurance purposes. Combined with the thinking that pregnancy is a pre-existing condition, it does appear that Watertiger was correct in her belief that being a woman is a pre-existing condition for the insurance moguls.

We really should be better than all of this leads me to believe we are as a society. Shouldn’t we?

And because I can:

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dakine01

dakine01

Small town Kentucky country boy lived all over the country. Currently in Ruskin, FL