One would think that smirky plagiarist Ben Domenech, who hung his friends out to dry, would at the very least be the cut and fuckin’ paste master with all of his "borrowing" and "letting someone else do the work" but it appears: not so much. Writing for the apparently standardless The New Ledger, where he is employed as Editor in Chief  (No. Really. I am not kidding),  Ben takes a stab at his j’accuse! moment against Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and, well, I guess the New Ledger readers don’t understand clicky hyperlinky thingys so, what the hell, who’ll ever know?

Ben:

Sometimes, when it comes to an issue like abortion, people slip up and say what they mean. It’s seldom a point deemed appropriate for public discussion, but on occasion someone will point out that a hugely disproportionate number of abortions are executed upon black and Hispanic children. Occasionally, a pro-life person will even go so far as to wonder whether, for many supporters of legalized abortions, this fact is a feature of the system, not a bug. Supporters of legalized abortion at this point, offended by the idea, will typically recoil in horror at the suggestion, insisting that no responsible supporter of legalized abortion feels that way. Most abortion proponents will then insist that the disproportionate numbers of minority abortions is an unintended (and surely undesirable!) consequence of this nonetheless important social policy.

Thankfully, we have people like Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg around to remind us what an insidious lie this is, as she does in this weekend’s New York Times:

JUSTICE GINSBURG: Reproductive choice has to be straightened out. There will never be a woman of means without choice anymore. That just seems to me so obvious. The states that had changed their abortion laws before Roe [to make abortion legal] are not going to change back. So we have a policy that affects only poor women, and it can never be otherwise, and I don’t know why this hasn’t been said more often.

Q: Are you talking about the distances women have to travel because in parts of the country, abortion is essentially unavailable, because there are so few doctors and clinics that do the procedure? And also, the lack of Medicaid for abortions for poor women?

JUSTICE GINSBURG: Yes, the ruling about that surprised me. [Harris v. McRae — in 1980 the court upheld the Hyde Amendment, which forbids the use of Medicaid for abortions.] Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of. So that Roe was going to be then set up for Medicaid funding for abortion. [Emphasis mine]

There is no way to interpret this statement that does not expose the ugly underbelly of a significant part of the legalized abortion movement. After all, the statistics are unambiguous–the “populations” that are effectively culled by abortion are overwhelmingly blacks and hispanics. One could expand Justice Ginsburg’s statement to its furthest charitable limit and say that Justice Ginsburg didn’t think that blacks and hispanics shouldn’t have their populations kept down, specifically, but rather that just in general we don’t want to have too many poor or unwanted people hanging around. This argument would have much in common with that found in the bestselling book Freakonomics, which used crime statistics to argue that abortion filled a communal need by casting out the “weak” to ensure the “strong” survive, with a coldly calculating description of ethnic cleansing.

Yet even if we suppose that Justice Ginsburg was not proceeding from the Freakonomics perspective, and was instead totally uninformed about the statistics of abortion today, there is no escaping the fact that she believes that there is an identifiable group of people that society “[doesn’t] want to have too many of.” And by “[doesn’t] want to have too many of,” she means “they should be killed in utero,” disposed of with medical precision before they are allowed to take a breath.

Ben was so excited about adding that [emphasis mine] that he failed to leave an ellipsis indicating that Ginsburg wasn’t done speaking. Here is the complete Bader Ginsburg answer:

Q: Are you talking about the distances women have to travel because in parts of the country, abortion is essentially unavailable, because there are so few doctors and clinics that do the procedure? And also, the lack of Medicaid for abortions for poor women? 

JUSTICE GINSBURG: Yes, the ruling about that surprised me. [Harris v. McRae — in 1980 the court upheld the Hyde Amendment, which forbids the use of Medicaid for abortions.] Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of. So that Roe was going to be then set up for Medicaid funding for abortion. Which some people felt would risk coercing women into having abortions when they didn’t really want them. But when the court decided McRae, the case came out the other way. And then I realized that my perception of it had been altogether wrong.

I invited several people to look at both quotes and the general feeling, when looking at the entire quote, is that Ginsburg seems to be saying that she was concerned that Medicare funds would be used or dangled to coerce/force women to have abortions; in particular the poor or minorities. Honestly, it’s difficult to grasp with any specificity what she is saying here but it is even more difficult when someone like Domenech intentionally leaves off the second portion of the quote because it muddles his point and mitigates some of the damage that he hoped to inflict.

Which is to say, Ben Domenech may not plagiarize anymore but that doesn’t mean he’s any less dishonest.

TBogg

TBogg

Yeah. Like I would tell you....

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