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Help me out here, because my right-wing logic interpolation machine is failing me.

Glenn Reynolds seems quite flustered today with his new headline:

MORE REPORTS OF MASSIVE VOTER FRAUD BY ACORN.

Oh my! Except there is no voter fraud. What they’re talking about is a problem with registration, not voting. I guess when you’re typing propaganda in a highly aroused state, little things like that are bound to slip.

Same old canard — 2100 registration forms handed in by Acorn aren’t valid. Now these are probably the ones Acorn submitted which they tagged as "suspicious," which they are required to do by law.

But I’m having trouble gaming this out. What is it exactly they think Acorn is up to? Instacracker:

ANOTHER UPDATE: Robert Mayer emails: "That post regarding ACORN was absolutely astounding to me. I know that there have been problems with voter fraud in America. It has existed since the ballot box. But what ACORN is doing, with 1.3 million voter registrations turned in nationwide, is akin to what I have seen in places like Belarus. All 1.3 million of those registrations should be considered suspect. If the voting process is allowed to become so derelict, then we don’t deserve to be any better off than a third world despotism. And eventually, we won’t be." Some people would like it that way.

What do they think Acorn is planning here? To send those 2100 people to the polls to vote a second time? Is that it?

The St. Petersberg Times today says that "Mickey Mouse tried to register to vote in Florida this summer. Orange County elections officials rejected his application, which was stamped with the logo of the nonprofit group ACORN."

If that was the plan, don’t you think they’d pick a name that was, oh I don’t know, a bit less likely to raise red flags than "Mickey Mouse?" Many of the registration forms flagged by ACORN were incomplete. If their intention was to stuff the ballot box on election day, don’t you think they’d do a better job of dummying them up?

Adam Doster at Progressive Illinois:

[T]here’s no evidence these imaginary people turn around and vote in November. Given Indiana’s strict voter ID law, it would actually be next to impossible for anyone to cast a ballot under the name of a submarine sandwich chain or a dead person.

ACORN has so far registered 1.3 million new voters, mostly Democrats, enough to scare any respectable pencil-squeezing Republican. The numbers involved remind me of the signatures that were collected to recall Gray Davis in California in 2003:

Supporters of the recall turned in 1.65 million signatures, about 1.36 million of which — about 82 percent — were deemed valid, according to figures released by the secretary of state’s office.

That’s 300,000 signatures that couldn’t be verified. Darryl Issa paid $1 per signature, or $1.65 million dollars to facilitate the recall. It’s just what happens when you send people out onto the street and offer to pay them to get people to sign up — it’s factored in by reasonable business people as the "cost of doing business."

But conservatives rarely understand how things work. They don’t take the time and don’t have the minds. We’re thus treated to a lot of smoldering innuendo, a bunch of supposedly damning facts, but what they think the ultimate Acorn conspiracy is never really comes together into a concrete plan. We’re all just supposed to nod knowingly, assume that "where there’s smoke there’s fire," and repeat John McCain’s talking points until told to do otherwise.

Help me out here, because my right-wing logic interpolation machine is failing me.

Glenn Reynolds seems quite flustered today with his new headline:  

MORE REPORTS OF MASSIVE VOTER FRAUD BY ACORN.

Oh my!  Except there is no voter fraud.  What they’re talking about is a problem with registration, not voting.   I guess when you’re typing propaganda in a highly aroused state, little things like that are bound to slip.

Same old canard — 2100 registration forms handed in by Acorn aren’t valid.  Now these are probably the ones Acorn submitted which they tagged as "suspicious," which they are required to do by law. 

But I’m having trouble gaming this out.   What is it exactly they think Acorn is up to?  Instacracker:

ANOTHER UPDATE: Robert Mayer emails: "That post regarding ACORN was absolutely astounding to me. I know that there have been problems with voter fraud in America. It has existed since the ballot box. But what ACORN is doing, with 1.3 million voter registrations turned in nationwide, is akin to what I have seen in places like Belarus. All 1.3 million of those registrations should be considered suspect. If the voting process is allowed to become so derelict, then we don’t deserve to be any better off than a third world despotism. And eventually, we won’t be." Some people would like it that way.

What do they think Acorn is planning here?  To send those 2100 people to the polls to vote a second time?   Is that it?

The St. Petersberg Times today says that "Mickey Mouse tried to register to vote in Florida this summer.  Orange County elections officials rejected his application, which was stamped with the logo of the nonprofit group ACORN."

If that was the plan, don’t you think they’d pick a name that was, oh I don’t know, a bit less likely to raise red flags than "Mickey Mouse?"   Many of the registration forms flagged by ACORN were incomplete.  If their intention was to stuff the ballot box on election day, don’t you think they’d do a better job of dummying them up?

Adam Doster at Progressive Illinois:

[T]here’s no evidence these imaginary people turn around and vote in November. Given Indiana’s strict voter ID law, it would actually be next to impossible for anyone to cast a ballot under the name of a submarine sandwich chain or a dead person. 

ACORN has so far registered 1.3 million new voters, mostly Democrats, enough to scare any respectable pencil-squeezing Republican.  The numbers involved remind me of the signatures that were collected to recall Gray Davis in California in 2003:

Supporters of the recall turned in 1.65 million signatures, about 1.36 million of which — about 82 percent — were deemed valid, according to figures released by the secretary of state’s office. 

That’s 300,000 signatures that couldn’t be verified.  Darryl Issa paid $1 per signature, or $1.65 million dollars to facilitate the recall.  It’s just what happens when you send people out onto the street and offer to pay them to get people to sign up — it’s factored in by reasonable business people as the "cost of doing business." 

But conservatives rarely understand how things work.  They don’t take the time and don’t have the minds.  We’re thus treated to a lot of smoldering innuendo, a bunch of supposedly damning facts, but what they think the ultimate Acorn conspiracy is never really comes together into a concrete plan.  We’re all just supposed to nod knowingly, assume that "where there’s smoke there’s fire," and repeat John McCain’s talking points until told to do otherwise.

Jane Hamsher

Jane Hamsher

Jane is the founder of Firedoglake.com. Her work has also appeared on the Huffington Post, Alternet and The American Prospect. She’s the author of the best selling book Killer Instinct and has produced such films Natural Born Killers and Permanent Midnight. She lives in Washington DC.
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