john-mccain.thumbnail.jpgInitially, I was annoyed that McCain went off to showboat in DC over a financial crisis he didn’t understand. Now, I feel like he did us all a big favor. He role-played the kind of leadership we can expect from him–like "Better Know a District," minus Stephen Colbert.

Having returned to DC to "help" with the financial crisis, McCain acts decisively to provoke shouting bitterness recrimination and confusion at the bailout negotiations, without first bothering to read the plan he was shouting about, or the one he was attacking.

Luckily, his opponent, a conservative Republican pushing a rival plan involving tax cuts and further deregulation, hadn’t the plans, either:

Boehner and McCain discussed the bailout plan, but Republican leadership aides described the conversation as somewhat surreal. Neither man was familiar with the details of the proposal being pressed by House conservatives, and up to the moment they departed for the White House yesterday afternoon, neither had seen any description beyond news reports.

At 1:25 p.m., McCain left Boehner’s office through a back door, walking across the Capitol’s rotunda to the applause of tourists. Graham conceded the group knew little about the plan the nominee had come to Washington to try to shape.

This little episode perfectly encapsulates Republican crisis management: Ignore facts, pick fights, declare victory, repeat. 

This is the crisis management style we can look forward to  if McCain is elected.

john-mccain.thumbnail.jpgInitially, I was annoyed that McCain went off to showboat in DC over a financial crisis he didn’t understand. Now, I feel like he did us all a big favor. He role-played the kind of leadership we can expect from him–like "Better Know a District," minus Stephen Colbert.

Having returned to DC to "help" with the financial crisis, McCain acts decisively to provoke shouting bitterness recrimination and confusion at the bailout negotiations, without first bothering to read the plan he was shouting about, or the one he was attacking.

Luckily, his opponent, a conservative Republican pushing a rival plan involving tax cuts and further deregulation, hadn’t the plans, either:

Boehner and McCain discussed the bailout plan, but Republican leadership aides described the conversation as somewhat surreal. Neither man was familiar with the details of the proposal being pressed by House conservatives, and up to the moment they departed for the White House yesterday afternoon, neither had seen any description beyond news reports.

At 1:25 p.m., McCain left Boehner’s office through a back door, walking across the Capitol’s rotunda to the applause of tourists. Graham conceded the group knew little about the plan the nominee had come to Washington to try to shape.

This little episode perfectly encapsulates Republican crisis management: Ignore facts, pick fights, declare victory, repeat. 

This is the crisis management style we can look forward to if McCain is elected.

Lindsay Beyerstein

Lindsay Beyerstein