Sridhar has a great post at the Streak about how Eliot Spitzer told you so:

It seems fitting now that the nation’s financial landscape resembles Berlin circa 1945 that we ask what could have happened if Eliot Spitzer, a man whom I spent a considerable amount of time around during his time as New York’s attorney general, had not fallen from public grace for his moral failings.

He was, at least before he won the governorship of New York, Wall Street’s crusader: The man who looked at the damage done by the deregulation of the markets and was doing his best to rectify it. He was ambitious and hard-driving, more interested in trying to fundamentally change the DNA of how Wall Street worked than putting people in jail. As governor during this country’s mortgage crisis, he would have done his damndest to go after the problem months before anyone else. He would have been a vital ally for Sen. Barack Obama’s own calls for a systemic shift in how our banking and insurance industry operates. But that was not to be.

And to steal a point my colleague Mary made at our editorial meeting today, this whole shit reduces to predatory lending. Prophet of the politics of opposing predatory lending? Fellow philanderer John Edwards. Does it take a cheater to know the true face of financial triflin’?

Spencer Ackerman

Spencer Ackerman