CommunityPam's House Blend

Did I not tell you that the body and injury count was being suppressed? More proof, made public. And the figures are worse than I thought.

Nearly 17,000 service members medically evacuated from Iraq and Afghanistan are absent from public Pentagon casualty reports commonly cited by newspapers, according to military data reviewed by United Press International. Most don’t fit the definition of casualties, according to the Pentagon, but a veterans’ advocate said they should all be counted.

The Pentagon has reported 1,019 dead and 7,245 wounded from Iraq.

The military has evacuated 16,765 individual service members from Iraq and Afghanistan for injuries and ailments not directly related to combat, according to the U.S. Transportation Command, which is responsible for the medical evacuations. Most are from Operation Iraqi Freedom.

The Pentagon’s public casualty reports, available at www.defenselink.mil, list only service members who died or were wounded in action. The Pentagon’s own definition of a war casualty provided to UPI in December describes a casualty as, “Any person who is lost to the organization by having been declared dead, duty status/whereabouts unknown, missing, ill, or injured.”

The casualty reports do list soldiers who died in non-combat-related incidents or died from illness. But service members injured or ailing from the same non-combat causes (the majority that appear to be “lost to the organization”)are not reflected in those Pentagon reports.

A veterans’ advocate said the Pentagon should make a full reporting of the casualties, including non-combat ailments and injuries. “They are still casualties of war,” said Mike Schlee, director of the National Security and Foreign Relations Division at the American Legion. “I think we have to have an honest disclosure of what the short- and long-term casualties of any conflict are.”

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Pam Spaulding

Pam Spaulding