TBogg

You’ve got to remember that these are just simple farmers, these are people of the land, the common clay of the New West. You know . . . morons.

Rick Perlstein on the True Believers:

The vibe at my next stop is different. None of the people at Kitty and Tom Harmon’s bungalow are stupid. Instead they are the kind of “well-informed” that comes from overlong exposure to conservative media: conservatives who construct towers of impressive intellectual complexity on toothpick-weak foundations. My hosts are Stepford-nice (Mom sports “Hello Kitty!” seat covers in her car and loads me down with shortbread for the flight home; Dad shows off the herb garden he’ll use to season my eggs if I consent to stay the night). But everyone present shows a glint of steel when their man’s character is challenged.

“One of the reasons I respect this president is that he is honest. I believe that after eight years, the dark years of the Clinton administration, we finally have a man in the White House who respects that office and who speaks honestly.”

The speaker is Christina, an intense, articulate, and passionate publicist.

“Such a refreshing change for the country. People believe in the president.”

I don’t mention recent poll figures suggesting that more Americans believe John Kerry than Bush when it comes to terrorism.

After affirming “I still believe that there are weapons of mass destruction”—the commonplace is beyond challenge—Christina displays another facet of the conservative fantasy: Going into Iraq, she says, “is not the sort of thing one does if one wants to be popular. . . . He doesn’t stick his finger in the wind.” I don’t challenge that point, either—though if I did I might ask why Bush scheduled the divisive debate over the intervention for the height of the 2002 campaign season, more certain of what Andrew Card called “new products” than his father, who held off deliberation on the first Iraq war until after the 1990 congressional elections.

Instead I challenge the grandmotherly lady sitting on the piano bench.

Says Delores: “There is an agenda—to get rid of God in our country.”

Chirps the reporter: Certainly not on the part of John Kerry, who once entertained dreams of entering the priesthood.

I’m almost laughed out of the room.

I ask why Kerry goes to mass every week if he’s trying to get rid of God. “Public relations!” a young man calls out from across the room. “Same reason he does everything else.” Cue for Delores to repeat something a rabbi told her: “We have to stand together, because this is what happened in Europe. You know—once they start taking this right and that right. And you have the Islamic people . . . ”

She trails off. I ask whether she’s referring to the rise of fascism. “We’re losing our rights as Christians: yes. And being persecuted again.”

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TBogg

TBogg

Yeah. Like I would tell you....