A pair of citizen journalists stand close together as one types on a laptop in front of a row of police officers at an Occupy Wall Street protest on December 12, 2011. In revolutionary media, citizen journalists no longer try to remain neutral or removed from the action happening in the streets. (Flickr / Jessica Lehrman)
20 Aug 2015

What Is Revolutionary Media? 3 Key Ideas

I wanted to talk today about the challenges of being a new media journalist today, and I’ve got three major points and a couple challenges we face that I plan to touch on.

We all agree that old media is dying, that’s part of why we’re here. It’s also oppressing people on the way out by throwing a temper tantrum as it dies, and it’s hurting everybody — especially those of us who want to be journalists in a sustainable career, and for anyone who wants to reach people.

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File: A photojournalist balances his camera on his arm as he takes a photograph in Iran on May 17, 2007. (Flickr / Hamed Saber)
10 Aug 2015

Pentagon War Manual Gives Military License To Target & Attack Journalists

The Pentagon has adopted a “law of war manual” [PDF], which enables commanders to treat journalists as “unprivileged belligerents.” It suggests that correspondents who report some information about combat operations may be taking “direct part in hostilities,” a disturbing argument for justifying the killing of reporters in war zones.

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A cluster of radomes (radar domes) hiding surveillance antennae at Pine Gap Defence Base in Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, photographed from nearby Mount Gillen on September 22, 2013. Pine Gap is believed to be a key part of the international ECHELON dragnet surveillance system. (Wikimedia Commons / Mark Marathon)
06 Aug 2015

Journalist, Who Unmasked ECHELON, On 40 Years Exposing The Global Surveillance State

Kevin Gosztola interviews Duncan Campbell, recently published in The Intercept, about his 4 decades as a journalist dedicated to uncovering the surveillance state and the international ECHELON program. Campbell says less has changed for today’s journalists than you might think.

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