File: Razor wire outside a prison in Maryland. (Flickr / Fred Dunn)
31 Aug 2015

Tennessee Department of Corrections Struggles To Keep The Lid On Prison Crisis

The Tennessee Department of Corrections is threatening and intimidating corrections officers speaking out against dangerous work conditions, according to a letter [PDF] published on August 27 by the American Civil Liberties Union of Tennessee. The organization asked the DOC to clearly state it will not seek to silence or retaliate against employees for their speech.

0
File: A gavel rests atop a printed document. (Flickr / Brian Turner)
28 Aug 2015

Key Constitutional Issues Avoided as Lawsuit Against NSA Surveillance Heads Back to Lower Court

Today, a federal appeals court vacated a preliminary injunction against the National Security Agency’s phone records surveillance program, and the lawsuit was sent back to the lower court for further proceedings if appropriate. But the U.S. Court of Appeals did not rule on whether the program, exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, was lawful or not.

0
File: A redacted email. (Flickr / opensource.com)
26 Aug 2015

Ruling Makes It Harder For U.S. To Charge High FOIA Fees To Media, Nonprofits

The District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals issued a decision which could make a huge difference for alternative media and nonprofit organizations seeking to have fees waived when making Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. More and more agencies—at all levels of government—charge high fees for public documents.

0
Chicago Police Officer
16 Aug 2015

Podcast: Chicago Organizer Shares Outrage Over Stop And Frisk Deal

The ACLU of Illinois announced a “landmark” agreement with the Chicago Police Department and City of Chicago over stop and frisks earlier this month. However, soon after, there were multiple activist groups, which were upset with the ACLU because they believed the settlement undermined their efforts. In particular, local groups

0
Rose bushes bloom outside the Islamic Center of Portland. The center and its imam, Mohamed Sheikh Abdirahman Kariye, are long-time targets of government harassment and oppression. (Facebook / Islamic Center of Portland)
12 Aug 2015

The US Persecution Of A Portland Imam Involved In Challenging The No Fly List

The United States seeks to deport the imam of the biggest mosque in Oregon, a religious leader who is also a plaintiff in a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) against the No Fly List. Mohamed Sheikh Abdirahman Kariye, a Somali who entered the US in 1982, stands accused of lying when he completed documents to become a naturalized citizen. But, as the ACLU points out in a filing, the new case aimed at revoking Kariye’s citizenship “makes it hard to take seriously” the government’s “assertion” that they cannot provide more information in DHS letters to Americans contesting their inclusion on the No Fly List.

0
Mississippi Attorney General Jim Wood speaks at an event supporting his re-election on June 16, 2007. (Wikimedia Commons / Natalie Maynor)
05 Aug 2015

ACLU Demands Mississippi Stop Invading Privacy Of Millions Of Google Users

On Monday, the ACLU asked an attorney general to “back off” and stop invading the privacy of Internet users to infringe on free speech or serve the agenda of big corporations and their lawyers. Google already sued Attorney General Jim Hood over the massive, invasive subpoena.

0
File: A close up of the chain linking a pair of handcuffs. (Flickr / banspy)
04 Aug 2015

Kentucky Deputy Sheriff Sued For Handcuffing Disabled Children, Abusing Girl With ‘Pain Compliance’

A lawsuit filed yesterday in Kentucky challenges the handcuffing of schoolchildren, especially those with disabilities, as a way of dealing with behavioral problems. According to the ACLU suit, two children with Attention Deficit Disorder and other disabilities, were “unlawfully restrained and handcuffed at school with excessive force and without necessity.”

0
19 May 2015

Government Seeks ‘Emergency Stay’ of Decision Ordering Release of Thousands of Torture Photos

The United States government requested an “emergency stay” of a federal court decision, which ordered thousands of photographs of detainee abuse and torture in Iraq and Afghanistan to be released.

In March, Judge Alvin Hellerstein of the US District Court of the Southern District of New York was no longer willing to tolerate the government’s secrecy arguments or the government’s refusal to individually review each photo and explain why each photo would pose a national security risk if made public.

0