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Short Film of the Week: “El Empleo”

What’s not to love about short films? Their length makes them easy to consume. Their availability means that, most of the time, you can read about a movie and immediately access it online for free. And, artistically, they’re difficult to make. Developing a complete world in minutes means that each word and image must absolutely move the story forward.

This week’s pick is a real gem. Clocking in at just over 6 minutes, Santiago Grasso’s, El Empleo, has won an impressive 102 awards at film festivals. The story is set in a delightfully fresh cartoon universe where people have taken over the tasks of inanimate objects and everyone has a job. We follow our protagonist as he wakes up and gets ready for work; employing human chairs, tables, coat-racks, and more. Stepping outside with him reveals a city where human taxis (via piggyback) are the standard mode of transportation and becoming a stoplight or part of a door is a valid career choice.

Of course, the big reveal comes at the end when we learn what our protagonist does for a living. So what does it all mean? Is this a film about the 99%? Is it offering solutions, commenting on problems, or both? Check it out and share your thoughts in the comments.

Know of a film that you think would make a great “Short of the Week?” Drop me a line at shannon at shadowproof.wpengine.com.

ArtsCommunity

Short Film of the Week: “El Empleo”

What’s not to love about short films? Their length makes them easy to consume. Their availability means that, most of the time, you can read about a movie and immediately access it online for free. And, artistically, they’re difficult to make. Developing a complete world in minutes means that each word and image must absolutely move the story forward.

This week’s pick is a real gem. Clocking in at just over 6 minutes, Santiago Grasso’s, El Empleo, has won an impressive 102 awards at film festivals. The story is set in a delightfully fresh cartoon universe where people have taken over the tasks of inanimate objects and everyone has a job. We follow our protagonist as he wakes up and gets ready for work; employing human chairs, tables, coat-racks, and more. Stepping outside with him reveals a city where human taxis (via piggyback) are the standard mode of transportation and becoming a stoplight or part of a door is a valid career choice.

Of course, the big reveal comes at the end when we learn what our protagonist does for a living. So what does it all mean? Is this a film about the 99%? Is it offering solutions, commenting on problems, or both? Check it out and share your thoughts in the comments.

Know of a film that you think would make a great “Short of the Week?” Drop me a line at shannon@shadowproof.wpengine.com.

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Lisa Derrick

Lisa Derrick

Los Angeles native, attended UC Berkeley and Loyola Marymount University before punk rock and logophilia overtook her life. Worked as nightclub columnist, pop culture journalist and was a Hollywood housewife before writing for and editing Sacred History Magazine. Then she discovered the thrill of politics. She also appears frequently on the Dave Fanning Show, one of Ireland's most popular radio broadcasts.