CommunityFDL Main BlogThe Dissenter

Suspicionless Surveillance of Muslim Americans by NYPD Challenged by ACLU Lawsuit

Ray Kelly

New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly

A lawsuit against unlawful surveillance against Muslim communities by the New York Police Department (NYPD) was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), New York Civil Liberties Union and Clear Project yesterday.

It stems from many of the revelations that came out of the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting the Associated Press did last year on how the NYPD was mapping and monitoring the daily lives of Muslims living in and around New York City.

A filed complaint alleges that Mayor Michael Bloomberg, NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence David Cohen and the city of New York violated the fourteenth amendment rights of Muslim Americans, who are plaintiffs in the lawsuit.

Defendants “engaged in a policy and practice of targeting” Muslim Americans because of their “adherence and practice of the religion of Islam.” This singling out “stigmatized them as members of a religious community and condemned their religion as one that is the subject of intense suspicion and distrust, different from any other religion.” It was “discriminatory in purpose and effect” and violated the equal protection clause.

The city and police violated their right to free exercise of religion under the First Amendment by placing a “substantial burden” on Muslim Americans’ religious exercise in the practice of their faith. They violated their right to free exercise of religion under the New York state constitution. And they violated the establishment clause of the First Amendment by explicitly and intentionally making “distinctions” between Muslim Americans “and individuals or institutions belonging to any other religious group.”

“It has had the effect of inhibiting Plaintiffs’ religious goals, conduct, and practice, and fosters an excessive government entanglement with religion by, among other things, subjecting Plaintiffs to intrusive surveillance, heightened police scrutiny, and infiltration by police informants and officers,” according to the lawsuit.

One of the plaintiffs or Muslim Americans alleging his rights have been violated is Mohammed Elshinawy. According to an ACLU profile of him, he is “an American citizen residing in Brooklyn with his wife and two children. He has taught and lectured about Islam at various institutions throughout New York City for the last 11 years, always on a volunteer basis.”

He believes he has been spied upon by the NYPD in some form since he was a student at Brooklyn College in 2004 because “attendees at his lectures and congregants at mosques at which he delivered sermons” have warned him that the NYPD has questioned them “about him” or asked them “to inform on the contents of his religious lessons and sermons.” He also has been “approached by individuals he suspected or later discovered were NYPD officers or informants.”

It appears one possible informant, Bilal, attempted to entrap Elshinawy:
In approximately the fall of 2004, Bilal began attending Mr. Elshinawy’s lectures and classes regularly. Mr. Elshinawy suspected that Bilal might be an informant who was recording his lectures because, despite being the most frequent attendee, Bilal did not listen to the lectures and instead regularly fell asleep minutes after each one began.

Mr. Elshinawy’s suspicion that Bilal was an informant was heightened in 2006, when Bilal told Mr. Elshinawy that he wanted to “do something” for Islam. Mr. Elshinawy responded that Bilal should partake in outreach and spread the faith, but Bilal said he was “tired of talking.” Suspecting that Bilal might be steering the conversation towards discussion of violence, Mr. Elshinawy told him that he should channel any anger towards explaining Islam and exemplifying Islamic manners—and immediately ended the conversation. After that, Bilal stopped attending Mr. Elshinawy’s lectures.

Elshinawy found out an NYPD undercover officer had gone on a “paintball trip organized by the Brooklyn College Islamic Society” in 2005. And, in 2012, he found out an NYPD informant named Shamiur Rahman had been sent to spy on him at two Brooklyn mosques where he lectured, Masjid Al-Ansar and Masjid Al-Farouq.

The effect of this infiltration and surveillance are such that Elshinawy has changed what he teaches in his lectures. He will not teach the “history of Islam in the Iberian peninsula, because he worries that his teachings will be misreported or misinterpreted by the NYPD.” He also has altered “Islamic historical narratives, particularly those highlighting valor, heroism, or anything that can be construed as lauding Islamic achievements.” And, “In his Friday sermons, Mr. Elshinawy shies away from discussing potentially controversial, political topics, or current events.” [cont’d]

CommunityThe Dissenter

Suspicionless Surveillance of Muslim Americans by NYPD Challenged by ACLU Lawsuit

Ray Kelly

New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly

A lawsuit against unlawful surveillance against Muslim communities by the New York Police Department (NYPD) was filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), New York Civil Liberties Union and Clear Project yesterday.

It stems from many of the revelations that came out of the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting the Associated Press did last year on how the NYPD was mapping and monitoring the daily lives of Muslims living in and around New York City.

A filed complaint alleges that Mayor Michael Bloomberg, NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence David Cohen and the city of New York violated the fourteenth amendment rights of Muslim Americans, who are plaintiffs in the lawsuit.

Defendants “engaged in a policy and practice of targeting” Muslim Americans because of their “adherence and practice of the religion of Islam.” This singling out “stigmatized them as members of a religious community and condemned their religion as one that is the subject of intense suspicion and distrust, different from any other religion.” It was “discriminatory in purpose and effect” and violated the equal protection clause.

The city and police violated their right to free exercise of religion under the First Amendment by placing a “substantial burden” on Muslim Americans’ religious exercise in the practice of their faith. They violated their right to free exercise of religion under the New York state constitution. And they violated the establishment clause of the First Amendment by explicitly and intentionally making “distinctions” between Muslim Americans “and individuals or institutions belonging to any other religious group.”

“It has had the effect of inhibiting Plaintiffs’ religious goals, conduct, and practice, and fosters an excessive government entanglement with religion by, among other things, subjecting Plaintiffs to intrusive surveillance, heightened police scrutiny, and infiltration by police informants and officers,” according to the lawsuit.

One of the plaintiffs or Muslim Americans alleging his rights have been violated is Mohammed Elshinawy. According to an ACLU profile of him, he is “an American citizen residing in Brooklyn with his wife and two children. He has taught and lectured about Islam at various institutions throughout New York City for the last 11 years, always on a volunteer basis.”

He believes he has been spied upon by the NYPD in some form since he was a student at Brooklyn College in 2004 because “attendees at his lectures and congregants at mosques at which he delivered sermons” have warned him that the NYPD has questioned them “about him” or asked them “to inform on the contents of his religious lessons and sermons.” He also has been “approached by individuals he suspected or later discovered were NYPD officers or informants.”

It appears one possible informant, Bilal, attempted to entrap Elshinawy:
In approximately the fall of 2004, Bilal began attending Mr. Elshinawy’s lectures and classes regularly. Mr. Elshinawy suspected that Bilal might be an informant who was recording his lectures because, despite being the most frequent attendee, Bilal did not listen to the lectures and instead regularly fell asleep minutes after each one began.

Mr. Elshinawy’s suspicion that Bilal was an informant was heightened in 2006, when Bilal told Mr. Elshinawy that he wanted to “do something” for Islam. Mr. Elshinawy responded that Bilal should partake in outreach and spread the faith, but Bilal said he was “tired of talking.” Suspecting that Bilal might be steering the conversation towards discussion of violence, Mr. Elshinawy told him that he should channel any anger towards explaining Islam and exemplifying Islamic manners—and immediately ended the conversation. After that, Bilal stopped attending Mr. Elshinawy’s lectures.

Elshinawy found out an NYPD undercover officer had gone on a “paintball trip organized by the Brooklyn College Islamic Society” in 2005. And, in 2012, he found out an NYPD informant named Shamiur Rahman had been sent to spy on him at two Brooklyn mosques where he lectured, Masjid Al-Ansar and Masjid Al-Farouq.

The effect of this infiltration and surveillance are such that Elshinawy has changed what he teaches in his lectures. He will not teach the “history of Islam in the Iberian peninsula, because he worries that his teachings will be misreported or misinterpreted by the NYPD.” He also has altered “Islamic historical narratives, particularly those highlighting valor, heroism, or anything that can be construed as lauding Islamic achievements.” And, “In his Friday sermons, Mr. Elshinawy shies away from discussing potentially controversial, political topics, or current events.” (more…)

Previous post

Firedoglake Joins 100+ Civil Liberties Groups, Internet Companies in Calling for Congressional Investigation into NSA Spying

Next post

FBI Director Says Drones Have Been Used in America

Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola is managing editor of Shadowproof Press. He also produces and co-hosts the weekly podcast, "Unauthorized Disclosure."