CommunityFDL Main Blog

Legal Residency Middle Ground Would Win Over No One

It would seem the American people really only fall into two camps when it comes to undocumented immigrants.  There is a small fraction who strongly oppose lettng them stay in any way and the large majority who would support offering a pathway to citizenship.

Some polls have found that when offered a range of choices, a segment of Americans think granting undocumented immigrants permanent residency status but not full citizenship would be the best policy, but a new Gallup polls shows this middle ground position is really a political non-factor. From Gallup:

What is interesting about this poll is that it does not ask people what their ideal policy is, just if they would support a policy. In politics this is often the far more important question.

The poll found there is only a tiny minority who would support legal residency but would reject a law that contained a pathway to citizenship. While it is likely some in that 65 percent who would back a pathway to citizenship might prefer a different policy, it would seem most don’t consider that a deal breaker. What they are most concerned about is just getting a solution.

Trying to make legislation more popular by setting a legal residency only “middle course” will do nothing to gain it support, while alienating the main groups pushing for a bill.

CommunityFDL Action

Legal Residency Middle Ground Would Win Over No One

It would seem the American people really only fall into two camps when it comes to undocumented immigrants.  There is a small fraction who strongly oppose letting them stay in any way and the large majority who would support offering a pathway to citizenship.

Some polls have found that when offered a range of choices, a segment of Americans think granting undocumented immigrants permanent residency status but not full citizenship would be the best policy, but a new Gallup polls shows this middle ground position is really a political non-factor. From Gallup:

What is interesting about this poll is that it does not ask people what their ideal policy is, just if they would support a policy. In politics this is often the far more important question.

The poll found there is only a tiny minority who would support legal residency but would reject a law that contained a pathway to citizenship. While it is likely some in that 65 percent who would back a pathway to citizenship might prefer a different policy, it would seem most don’t consider that a deal breaker. What they are most concerned about is just getting a solution.

Trying to make legislation more popular by setting a legal residency only “middle course” will do nothing to gain it support, while alienating the main groups pushing for a bill.

Previous post

Countries Subject to US Intervention Become Executioners & Impose Death Penalty

Next post

Daily Commute Traffic Linked To Asthma, Anxiety, And Now Cancer

Jon Walker

Jon Walker

Jonathan Walker grew up in New Jersey. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2006. He is now living in the Washington DC area. He created a politics and policy blog, The Walker Report (http://jwalkerreport.blogspot.com/).