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WikiLeaks Hit with DOS Attack as It Releases Tens of Thousands of Cables

(photo: DonkeyHotey)

Hours after announcing it would be releasing tens of thousands of cables from various countries including Libya, China, Israel and Afghanistan, WikiLeaks announced that it was sustaining denial of service (DOS) attacks and had “regressed” to its backup servers.

Not surprisingly, WikiLeaks suggested on Twitter that the attacks were from a state-sponsored entity. The organization asked, “Are state directed Denial of Service attacks, legally, a war crime against civilian infrastructure?” And, “Should we, legally, declare war on state aggressors that commit infrastructure war crimes against us?”

These messages came early in the morning on August 24. Releases had already been posted. Followers were helping WikiLeaks “crowd source” the cables by tweeting out their findings with the hashtag #wlfind.

“Note how DOS attacks on WikiLeaks are not investigated but DOS attacks on corrupt finance companies lead to dozens of arrests,” the Twitter feed for WikiLeaks declared. Salon blogger Glenn Greenwald wittily reacted, “I’m sure the DOJ will investigate the cyber-attacks on WikiLeaks as aggressively as those on Paypal, Amazon, MasterCard & Sony.”

The issue of DOS attacks has exposed where the powerful in America place their priorities and how some computer crimes are not computer crimes worth investigating.  (cont’d)

CommunityThe Dissenter

WikiLeaks Hit With DoS Attack as It Releases Tens of Thousands of Cables

(photo: DonkeyHotey)

Hours after announcing it would be releasing tens of thousands of cables from various countries including Libya, China, Israel and Afghanistan, WikiLeaks announced that it was sustaining denial of service (DOS) attacks and had “regressed” to its backup servers.

Not surprisingly, WikiLeaks suggested on Twitter that the attacks were from a state-sponsored entity. The organization asked, “Are state directed Denial of Service attacks, legally, a war crime against civilian infrastructure?” And, “Should we, legally, declare war on state aggressors that commit infrastructure war crimes against us?”

These messages came early in the morning on August 24. Releases had already been posted. Followers were helping WikiLeaks “crowd source” the cables by tweeting out their findings with the hashtag #wlfind.

“Note how DOS attacks on WikiLeaks are not investigated but DoS attacks on corrupt finance companies lead to dozens of arrests,” the Twitter feed for WikiLeaks declared. Salon blogger Glenn Greenwald wittily reacted, “I’m sure the DOJ will investigate the cyber-attacks on WikiLeaks as aggressively as those on Paypal, Amazon, MasterCard & Sony.”

The issue of DoS attacks has exposed where the powerful in America place their priorities and how some computer crimes are not computer crimes worth investigating. In July, sixteen individuals alleged to be members of the hacktivist group Anonymous, known for engaging in cyber operations for political and social reasons, were arrested. The FBI raided homes seizing computers and computer-related accessories. The Justice Department claimed fourteen of the individuals had been part of the distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks on PayPal back in December 2010, when PayPal suspended WikiLeaks’ accounts, making it impossible for the organization to receive donations via PayPal. (more…)

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Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola

Kevin Gosztola is managing editor of Shadowproof Press. He also produces and co-hosts the weekly podcast, "Unauthorized Disclosure."