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What you missed on Saturday Art and Food Sunday

In case you couldn’t join us this weekend for all things culture, art, and food, here’s what you missed…

On Saturday Art, Jake Remington had a piece entitled applehead:

masaccio discussed the Mary Magdalen by Donatello:

Maddelena Penitente by Donatello is at the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo in Florence, Italy. It is a statue of St. Mary Magdalen, carved from wood and painted, though little of the paint remains. The Catholic Encyclopedia describes her as follows:

In the New Testament she is mentioned among the women who accompanied Christ and ministered to Him (Luke 8:2-3), where it is also said that seven devils had been cast out of her (Mark 16:9). She is next named as standing at the foot of the cross (Mark 15:40; Matthew 27:56; John 19:25; Luke 23:49). She saw Christ laid in the tomb, and she was the first recorded witness of the Resurrection.

Bill Egnor posted a piece about a big blue bronco in Denver:

l

Anyone who has flown into Denver International Airport in the last few years has seen the subject of this week’s Denver Public Art series. It is the gigantic blue bronco, actually named Mustang by artist Luis Jimenez.

To me this is public art at its worst. It is a huge steel and fiberglass statue. While it is big enough to see, it sits in a place where all traffic has to keep moving and there is no chance for the viewer to really look a the work.

Even if there were a chance to appreciate it, this is one ugly statue to my mind. The bright blue color takes away all any realism. Then add in the orange glowing eyes and this thing is just hideous.

Mitchell Frye had a photograph in the Coney Island rubble:

And Adam Tolland had a print entitled Erotic Japan:

On Food Sunday, Jessica Glasscoe had a recipe for Strawberry Jam Cakes:

These past two weeks have been filled with errands and a seemingly endless list of chores. Leaving town for a month-long vacation isn’t a hardship by any means, but it creates a small mountain of "catch-up" activities that prevent you for weeks from doing anything remotely similar to relaxing. This weekend we saw the valley on the other side of the mountain. Having finished the last of the laundry and other essentials, Dustin and I painted the bathroom, tended our neglected garden, and placed the last few windows in the greenhouse. Our chores were done, and we sat, after dinner, wondering if there was anything sweet we could whip up, as a reward for our hard work.

alanaclaire taught us how to make butter lambs:

Really, that is only a half truth. We are sort of Jewish. We are genetically Jewish and a little bit culturally Jewish. We were raised with Brooklyn old people and bagels, with intermittent Yiddish cusses, and with distant second cousins who may have showed us the terrifying and mystical tattoos on their forearms, those badges of ultimate strength and survival.

This morning, my older daughter woke us up pretty early. She had set up little bowls of dye from a kit scored from the dollar store earlier this week. She ran into our bedroom, jumping up and down, chanting, "Can we dye eggs now?"

We rolled out of bed, and she continued to dance around us as I stumbled through coffee preparation. "What do I do? What do I do."

"The thing is," my husband said in some sort of Israeli- Indian accent for extra effect. "Your Mamma and Poppa are Jewish, and we have no idea what to do."

Bill Egnor had a recipe for Bagels (which I made!):

IMG_0126

Many of the recipes I have been writing about lately seem to take a lot of time. The dough needs to rise for eight hours or chill over-night, or both. Well this week is nothing like that. This week we’ll be making water bagels, and they only take two hours from start to finish.

Bagels are great bread. They have an interesting crust because they are boiled before backing. They are also incredibly versatile, from the basic recipe you can make garlic, onion, salt, sesame seed or poppy seed with just the judicious application of the topping you prefer.

There are a couple of tricks to making great bagels at home. The first is to have all you gear and ingredients ready to go, before you start. The fast rising time and the need to boil them really favors the prepared cook, so read the whole recipe, get the pan ready, get all your ingredients measured and ready to go before you start the process. If you do this you will be way ahead of the game.

And Toby Wollin had the incredible edible food news:

And a very good morning to everyone; Joyous Easter to everyone who celebrates.  It’s been an amazing weather week at Chez Siberia with several days in the 70s and 80s (soon to be followed by several days in the 50s, which is definitely more like it in terms of April weather for Upstate New York). (Cue the sound of teletype machines)

To the news!!

So head on over, leave us a comment, try out a recipe, and join us next week for more Food and Art!

CommunityMy FDL

What you missed on Saturday Art and Food Sunday

In case you couldn’t join us this weekend for all things culture, art, and food, here’s what you missed…

On Saturday Art, Jake Remington had a piece entitled applehead:

masaccio discussed the Mary Magdalen by Donatello:

Maddelena Penitente by Donatello is at the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo in Florence, Italy. It is a statue of St. Mary Magdalen, carved from wood and painted, though little of the paint remains. The Catholic Encyclopedia describes her as follows:

In the New Testament she is mentioned among the women who accompanied Christ and ministered to Him (Luke 8:2-3), where it is also said that seven devils had been cast out of her (Mark 16:9). She is next named as standing at the foot of the cross (Mark 15:40; Matthew 27:56; John 19:25; Luke 23:49). She saw Christ laid in the tomb, and she was the first recorded witness of the Resurrection.

Bill Egnor posted a piece about a big blue bronco in Denver:

l

Anyone who has flown into Denver International Airport in the last few years has seen the subject of this week’s Denver Public Art series. It is the gigantic blue bronco, actually named Mustang by artist Luis Jimenez.

To me this is public art at its worst. It is a huge steel and fiberglass statue. While it is big enough to see, it sits in a place where all traffic has to keep moving and there is no chance for the viewer to really look a the work.

Even if there were a chance to appreciate it, this is one ugly statue to my mind. The bright blue color takes away all any realism. Then add in the orange glowing eyes and this thing is just hideous.

Mitchell Frye had a photograph in the Coney Island rubble:

And Adam Tolland had a print entitled Erotic Japan:

On Food Sunday, Jessica Glasscoe had a recipe for Strawberry Jam Cakes:

These past two weeks have been filled with errands and a seemingly endless list of chores. Leaving town for a month-long vacation isn’t a hardship by any means, but it creates a small mountain of "catch-up" activities that prevent you for weeks from doing anything remotely similar to relaxing. This weekend we saw the valley on the other side of the mountain. Having finished the last of the laundry and other essentials, Dustin and I painted the bathroom, tended our neglected garden, and placed the last few windows in the greenhouse. Our chores were done, and we sat, after dinner, wondering if there was anything sweet we could whip up, as a reward for our hard work.

alanaclaire taught us how to make butter lambs:

Really, that is only a half truth. We are sort of Jewish. We are genetically Jewish and a little bit culturally Jewish. We were raised with Brooklyn old people and bagels, with intermittent Yiddish cusses, and with distant second cousins who may have showed us the terrifying and mystical tattoos on their forearms, those badges of ultimate strength and survival.

This morning, my older daughter woke us up pretty early. She had set up little bowls of dye from a kit scored from the dollar store earlier this week. She ran into our bedroom, jumping up and down, chanting, "Can we dye eggs now?"

We rolled out of bed, and she continued to dance around us as I stumbled through coffee preparation. "What do I do? What do I do."

"The thing is," my husband said in some sort of Israeli- Indian accent for extra effect. "Your Mamma and Poppa are Jewish, and we have no idea what to do."

Bill Egnor had a recipe for Bagels (which I made!):

IMG_0126

Many of the recipes I have been writing about lately seem to take a lot of time. The dough needs to rise for eight hours or chill over-night, or both. Well this week is nothing like that. This week we’ll be making water bagels, and they only take two hours from start to finish.

Bagels are great bread. They have an interesting crust because they are boiled before backing. They are also incredibly versatile, from the basic recipe you can make garlic, onion, salt, sesame seed or poppy seed with just the judicious application of the topping you prefer.

There are a couple of tricks to making great bagels at home. The first is to have all you gear and ingredients ready to go, before you start. The fast rising time and the need to boil them really favors the prepared cook, so read the whole recipe, get the pan ready, get all your ingredients measured and ready to go before you start the process. If you do this you will be way ahead of the game.

And Toby Wollin had the incredible edible food news:

And a very good morning to everyone; Joyous Easter to everyone who celebrates.  It’s been an amazing weather week at Chez Siberia with several days in the 70s and 80s (soon to be followed by several days in the 50s, which is definitely more like it in terms of April weather for Upstate New York). (Cue the sound of teletype machines)

To the news!!

So head on over, leave us a comment, try out a recipe, and join us next week for more Food and Art!

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Jason Rosenbaum

Jason Rosenbaum

Writer, musician, activist. Currently consulting for Bill Halter for U.S. Senate and a fellow at the New Organizing Institute.

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