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FDL Book Salon: The Rise of the Blogosphere, Sunday July 22 5PM EST

410xvb0wprl_aa240_.jpgWhat do Tom Paine, Ben Franklin and Alexander Hamilton have to do with the rise of the blogs?

Who was Publius?

Where and how did professional journalism emerge and how did it go wrong?

What is this new citizen journalism, and is it really all that new? Where does it sit, given America’s historical context? Where is it going?

Are the blogs the bastard children of I. F. Stone and the World Wide Web?

Aaron Barlow, known online for his work with ePluribus Media, is the author of the newly released book, “The Rise of the Blogosphere.” I’m incredibly excited to announce that we’ll have Aaron with us this Sunday to discuss the book, and yours truly will set up the conversation with a preliminary review.

Aaron’s a great guy and one sharp cookie, and he’s done terrific work looking at the rise of the blogosphere in historical context. I had the privilege of working with Aaron on an ePM project covering the Gannon/Guckert National Press Club appearance, back before my FDL days. I can’t say I even agree now with everything I wrote back then, but working with Aaron was a real pleasure, so please be sure to join us this Sunday for our Book Salon.

See you this Sunday at 2PM PST/5PM EST, right here at Firedoglake.

Book SalonCommunity

FDL Book Salon: The Rise of the Blogosphere, Sunday July 22 5PM EST

410xvb0wprl_aa240_.jpgWhat do Tom Paine, Ben Franklin and Alexander Hamilton have to do with the rise of the blogs?

Who was Publius?

Where and how did professional journalism emerge and how did it go wrong?

What is this new citizen journalism, and is it really all that new? Where does it sit, given America’s historical context? Where is it going?

Are the blogs the bastard children of I. F. Stone and the World Wide Web?

Aaron Barlow, known online for his work with ePluribus Media, is the author of the newly released book, “The Rise of the Blogosphere.” I’m incredibly excited to announce that we’ll have Aaron with us this Sunday to discuss the book, and yours truly will set up the conversation with a preliminary review.

Aaron’s a great guy and one sharp cookie, and he’s done terrific work looking at the rise of the blogosphere in historical context. I had the privilege of working with Aaron on an ePM project covering the Gannon/Guckert National Press Club appearance, back before my FDL days. I can’t say I even agree now with everything I wrote back then, but working with Aaron was a real pleasure, so please be sure to join us (more…)

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Pachacutec

Pachacutec

Pachacutec did not, as is commonly believed, die in 1471. To escape the tragic sight of his successors screwing up the Inca Empire he’d built, he fled east into the Amazon rain forest, where he began chewing lots of funky roots to get higher than Hunter Thompson ever dared. Oddly, these roots gave him not only a killer buzz, but also prolonged his life beyond what any other mortal has known, excluding Novakula. Whatever his doubts of the utility of living long enough to see old friends pop up in museums as mummies, or witness the bizarrely compelling spectacle of Katherine Harris, he’s learned a thing or two along the way. For one thing, he’s learned the importance of not letting morons run a country, having watched the Inca Empire suffer many civil wars requiring the eventual ruler to gain support from the priests and the national military. He now works during fleeting sober moments to build a vibrant progressive movement sufficiently strong and sustainable to drive a pointed stake through the heart of American “conservatism” forever. He enjoys a gay marriage, classic jazz and roots for the New York Mets.