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Oscar open thread

I was busy up until now and just saw Rachel Weisz pick up the Supporting Actress (The Constant Gardener) award so far (Brokeback‘s Michelle Williams was up for this one).

Anything of note yet? Horrible dresses/suits? Ungodly acceptance speeches?

John Stewart blows as host, sorry to say, because I like him.

Winners so far (updating as it goes along):
Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role
George Clooney
SYRIANA

Achievement in Visual Effects
KING KONG
Joe Letteri, Brian Van’t Hul, Christian Rivers and Richard Taylor

Best Animated Feature Film of the Year
WALLACE & GROMIT IN THE CURSE OF THE WERE-RABBIT
Nick Park and Steve Box

Best Live Action Short Film
SIX SHOOTER
Martin McDonagh

Best Animated Short Film
THE MOON AND THE SON: AN IMAGINED CONVERSATION
John Canemaker and Peggy Stern

Achievement in Costume Design
MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA
Colleen Atwood

Achievement in Makeup
THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE
Howard Berger and Tami Lane

Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role
Rachel Weisz
THE CONSTANT GARDENER

Best Documentary Short Subject
A NOTE OF TRIUMPH: THE GOLDEN AGE OF NORMAN CORWIN
Corinne Marrinan and Eric Simonson

Best Documentary Feature
MARCH OF THE PENGUINS
Luc Jacquet and Yves Darondeau

Achievement in Art Direction
MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA
John Myhre (Art Direction); Gretchen Rau (Set Decoration)

Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures (Original Score)
BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN
Gustavo Santaolalla

Honorary Academy Award
Robert Altman
(watching Lily Tomlin and Meryl Streep on stage introduce the clips before the introduction in an Altmanesque style was excruciating – and I like them)

Achievement in Sound Mixing
KING KONG
Christopher Boyes, Michael Semanick, Michael Hedges and Hammond Peek

Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures (Original Song)
“IT’S HARD OUT HERE FOR A PIMP” FROM HUSTLE & FLOW
Music and Lyric by Jordan Houston, Cedric Coleman and Paul Beauregard

Achievement in Sound Editing
KING KONG
Mike Hopkins and Ethan Van der Ryn

Best Foreign Language Film of the Year
TSOTSI
South Africa
Directed by Gavin Hood

Achievement in Film Editing
CRASH
Hughes Winborne

Actor in a Leading Role
Philip Seymour Hoffman
CAPOTE

Achievement in Cinematography
MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA
Dion Beebe

Actress in a Leading Role
Reese Witherspoon
WALK THE LINE

Achievement in Writing (Adapted Screenplay)
BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN
Screenplay by Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana

Achievement in Writing (Original Screenplay)
CRASH
Paul Haggis and Bobby Moresco

Achievement in Direction
BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN
Ang Lee

Best Picture
CRASH
Paul Haggis and Cathy Schulman, producers

CommunityFDL Main Blog

Oscar Open Thread

I have to say I’m liking the glamor/train fashion redux but Naomi Watts looks like she just took a stroll through the cobwebs of Peggy Noonan’s mind. Jessica Alba, on the other hand, looks fab.

Generally I hate writing about Hollywood so I defer to people like David E., John Rogers and and James Wolcott who do it and do it well. Wolcott says:

[T]he ‘Hollywood doesn’t reflect mainstream America’ argument is one of the oldest and phoniest in the playbook, with Michael Medved making the same case that Catholic organizers did in the 30’s to push for a decency code. The truth is that Hollywood has almost never reflected heartland values, from its birth it’s reflected urban energy, cosmopolitan taste, social conscience, and pagan fascination, and when it’s conformed to conventional pieties, as during the dreariest stretches of the postwar period, when disillusionment and subversion had to sneak in through the shadows of film noir as the topline product stayed shiny, bright, and chipmunk cheerful. Do you really think the racy, wisecracking, night-owl-edition, socially conscious crime dramas and comedies of Warner Brothers in the thirties reflected heartland values? Or those Lubitsch comedies with their flirty innuendos and musky intrigues so redolent of Paris and Budapest? Or the Astaire-Rogers "white telephone" musicals, with their French farce plots and Manhattan-skyline sparkle? MGM manufactured an enduring neo-Victorian mimicry of smalltown America in the Andy Hardy movies and others, but that didn’t so much reflect heartland values as reflect the immigrant vision of what the white-picket-fence country they imagined lay east of the Hollywood hills.

Think of the movies now considered classic (or semi-classic) from the great grunge stretch of the late Sixties and Seventies, movies such as Mean Streets, Taxi Driver, Dog Day Afternoon, Serpico, The Last Detail, Five Easy Pieces, Blazing Saddles, McCabe and Mrs. Miller, Nashville, The Wild Bunch, Straw Dogs, A Clockwork Orange, on and on–do these movies speak to the pieties and platitudes that William Bennett holds dear? Even back then during all the noise and excitement I remember sweet old ladies wondering why they didn’t make nice movies like The Sound of Music anymore, and they’re still asking that same question today. It may be the same old ladies, having gone through two generations of floral muu-muus. Get over it, grandma! They’re not going to make movies like Sound of Music anymore, they barely made them back then.

Amen.

The only thing I have strong opinions about are the best documentary category. Love love love Murderball, love Street Fight (gave Marshall an ad in the sidebar, please click), and I absolutely LOVED “The Death of Kevin Carter: Casualty of the Bang Bang Club” (nominated for best short documentary). That was some of the most remarkable storytelling I’ve seen in years, I was on the edge of my seat and I’m pulling for Dan Krauss.

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